• Crochet Patterns

    Picot Single Crochet Ear Warmer & Cowl Set

    Smiling woman wearing the Picot Single Crochet Stitch Ear Warmer and Cowl Set
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    I’m so excited to share with you my brand new ear warmer and cowl free crochet pattern. This project uses picot single crochet stitch to create tiny little bobbles on the surface of the project that give it a fun texture without the weight of real crochet bobble stitches. They are quick and fun to make and I just love the way that they look.

    This project uses a yarn that is relatively new to me but had me falling head over heels at first stitch: We Crochet Swish Worsted. For this pattern, I used the colouway Wonderland Heather and it is absolutley beautiful. It has the subtlest heathering and it is crazy soft. It is currently available in 33 different colours and I can’t wait to see what colours you all choose to use! Check out my review of this yarn HERE.

    Pin this Free Crochet Ear Warmer and Cowl Set Pattern for later SAVE

    For this project, I use a special crochet picot stitch called the picot single crochet stitch. This stitch modifies the single crochet stitch to add the CH 3 of a picot in the middle of the stitch. After finishing this stitch, a single crochet is placed in the next stitch which helps keep the picot stitch grounded so to speak and the picot stick out from the fabric. I find doing picot stitches like this to be quick and easy.

    Because of the way that this picot stitch used in this project is created, your work will not have straight edges right away. Your work will look like a rectangle that leans to one side. That’s normal and totally fixable. To fix this issue, you just need to block your project. I steam block almost everything so I just place my project on the foam mats and pin the piece so the edges are straight. Then, I steam it and let it dry. Wet blocking would probably be best for this project but, if you’re impatient to wear this, steam blocking will still work too.

    work in progress picture of the picot single crochet ear warmer

    This pattern is part of the Stitch & Hustle Perfect Picot Blog Hop that is generously being sponsored by We Crochet. Find the beautiful free crochet patterns of the other participants here:

    Mamas2Hands.comJosephine Clochehttps://mamas2hands.com/2020/09/25/josephine-cloche-crochet-pattern/
    The Loopy LambPicot Me Up Ear Warmer and Cowl Sethttps://www.theloopylamb.com/2020/09/25/picot-single-crochet-stitch-ear-warmer-and-cowl-set/
    Underground CrafterSleepy Sunrise Amigurumihttps://undergroundcrafter.com/2020/09/25/perfect-picot-blog-hop-sleepy-sunrise-amigurumi/
    The Stitchin’ MommyTropical Sunset Fingerless Mittshttps://www.thestitchinmommy.com/2020/09/tropical-sunset-fingerless-mitts-free-crochet-pattern.html
    Erica DietzPicot Edge Scarfhttps://www.5littlemonsters.com/2020/09/picot-edged-scarf.html
    Sincerely PamContessa Cropped Pulloverhttps://www.sincerelypam.com/contessa-cropped-pullover-crochet-pattern
    Love.life.yarnSimple Crochet Baby Bonnethttps://lovelifeyarn.com/simple-crochet-baby-bonnet/
    Crystalized DesignsKoKo Cocoon Cardiganhttps://www.crystalized-designs.com/koko-cocoon-cardigan-free-crochet-pattern/
    Briana K DesignsPicot Crochet Shawl Free Patternhttps://brianakdesigns.com/picot-crochet-shawl-free-pattern/
    Detroit KnotsHayloft Capelethttps://detroitknots.wordpress.com/?p=305
    Stitch & HustleAtlantic Waves Shawlhttps://www.stitchandhustle.com/free-patterns/atlantic-waves-shawl-free-crochet-pattern
    Oombawka Design CrochetSeptember Mandalahttps://oombawkadesigncrochet.com/2020/09/september-mandala-pattern.html
    MooglyPicot Trip Cowlhttps://www.mooglyblog.com/picot-trip-cowl/
    2 Bossay Knits / Michelle TharpesSummer Citrus Wraphttps://seriousasshookersblog.weebly.com/
    Joy of Motion CrochetDiagonal Sunset Wraphttps://joyofmotioncrochet.com/diagonal-sunset-wrap-free-crochet-pattern
    ACCROchetBoxed inhttps://www.accrochet.com/stitch-hustle-blog-hop/

    We’re also holding a MASSIVE giveaway in which FIVE (5) winners will be selected to win the yarn to make 3 of the projects included in the blog hop. This giveaway has been generously sponsored by We Crochet. The prize groups are below. This giveaway is open world wide and you need only enter the giveaway one to be entered for all prize packs! Entry form is included below the prize pack list.

    Prize Pack One
    Mamas2Hands.comJosephine Clochehttps://mamas2hands.com/2020/09/25/josephine-cloche-crochet-pattern/
    Love.life.yarnSimple Crochet Baby Bonnethttps://lovelifeyarn.com/simple-crochet-baby-bonnet/
    Underground CrafterSleepy Sunrise Amigurumihttps://undergroundcrafter.com/2020/09/25/perfect-picot-blog-hop-sleepy-sunrise-amigurumi/
    Erica DietzPicot Edge Scarfhttps://www.5littlemonsters.com/2020/09/picot-edged-scarf.html
    Prize Pack 2
    The Loopy LambPicot Me Up Ear Warmer and Cowl Sethttps://www.theloopylamb.com/2020/09/25/picot-single-crochet-stitch-ear-warmer-and-cowl-set/
    Sincerely PamContessa Cropped Pulloverhttps://www.sincerelypam.com/contessa-cropped-pullover-crochet-pattern
    Detroit KnotsHayloft Capelethttps://detroitknots.wordpress.com/?p=305
    Prize Pack 3
    Crystalized DesignsKoKo Cocoon Cardiganhttps://www.crystalized-designs.com/koko-cocoon-cardigan-free-crochet-pattern/
    Briana K DesignsPicot Crochet Shawl Free Patternhttps://brianakdesigns.com/picot-crochet-shawl-free-pattern/
    The Stitchin’ MommyTropical Sunset Fingerless Mittshttps://www.thestitchinmommy.com/2020/09/tropical-sunset-fingerless-mitts-free-crochet-pattern.html
    Prize Pack 4
    Stitch & HustleAtlantic Waves Shawlhttps://www.stitchandhustle.com/free-patterns/atlantic-waves-shawl-free-crochet-pattern
    Oombawka Design CrochetSeptember Mandalahttps://oombawkadesigncrochet.com/2020/09/september-mandala-pattern.html
    MooglyPicot Trip Cowlhttps://www.mooglyblog.com/picot-trip-cowl/
    Prize Pack 5
    2 Bossay Knits / Michelle TharpesCitrus Wraphttps://seriousasshookersblog.weebly.com/
    Joy of Motion CrochetDiagonal Sunset Wraphttps://joyofmotioncrochet.com/diagonal-sunset-wrap-free-crochet-pattern
    ACCROchetBoxed inhttps://www.accrochet.com/stitch-hustle-blog-hop/
    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    Learn how to do the Picot Single Crochet Stitch in my Tutorial Below:

    Picot Me Up Ear Warmer and Cowl Set

    Crochet earwarmer and cowl set lain out in a flat lay with coffee, yarn and a furls crochet hook

    You can purchase an inexpensive ad-free PDF version of this pattern for a small fee HERE on Ravelry and HERE on Etsy.

    Skill Level:

    • Intermediate

    Supplies For Crochet Ear Warmer:

    Supplies For Crochet Cowl

    If you’re planning on buying the materials for this project, please consider doing so through this affiliate link. It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free crochet patterns like this one.

    Abbreviations:


    Special Stitches:

    • Picot Single Crochet: Insert hook into indicated stitch, yarn over hook and pull through stitch.  Yarn over and pull through one loop on the hook three times.  Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook. (Find the tutorial HERE).


    Finished Ear Warmer Size:

    • Adult – 19.5” Long (before seaming) by 4.5” wide

    Finished Cowl Size:

    • 24.75” Long (before seaming) by 8.5” wide

    Gauge:

    • 15 HDC sts x 12 rows of pattern ST = 4 inches

    Notes:

    •  This pattern is worked back and forth in rows in a flat panel and then is seamed together at the short ends. 
    • The completed projects will slant to the right and appear to not have straight edges.  This is caused by the Picot Single Crochets shifting the work to the right.  This project must be blocked in order to straighten the edges to provide a clean, straight seam which also makes seaming the project together easier.
    • Instructions given in ** are to be repeated for the indicated number of repeats or the instructions provided next to the **


    Picot Me Up Ear Warmer Pattern


    Row 1: FHDC 75 or CH 76 and HDC in each ST across, starting in the 2nd CH from the hook. (75)
    Row 2: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (75)
    Row 3:  CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (75)
    Row 4:  CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (75)
    Row 5:  CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (75)

    Picot Me Up Crochet Ear Warmer made using Picot Single Crochet Stitch
    Smiling woman wearing a crochet ear warmer


    Row 6: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (75)
    Row 7: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (75)
    Row 8: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (75)
    Row 9: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (75)
    Row 10: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (75)
    Row 11: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (75)
    Rows 12 – 13: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (75)

    FO and leave a long tail to seam the ear warmer together.  Block your work using your preferred blocking method. 

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Woman looking down wearing a crochet ear warmer and cowl set

    Finishing Your Ear Warmer:

    Lay your ear warmer right side up in front of you.  Pick the short ends together, right sides touching. 

    Step one of closing up the crochet ear warmer

    Place the ends inside each other so they overlap about an inch.  Make sure your tail is on the outside. 

    closing up the ear warmer step 2

    Thread your tapestry needle on the long tail left when finishing off and sew back and forth through all four layers going through the edge stitches. 

    Sewing the closure - Step 3

    When done, take the unfinished parts pictured and sew them together end to end. 

    showing the unfishing parts of the crochet ear warmer to seam.

    When done seaming FO and weave in ends.  Turn your ear warmer right side out and you’re all set. 

    Finishing the seaming of the ear warmer closure.

    Picot Me Up Cowl Pattern:

    Row 1: FHDC 95 or CH 96 and HDC in each ST across, starting in the 2nd CH from the hook. (95)
    Row 2: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 3:  CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (95)
    Row 4:  CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 5:  CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (95)
    Row 6: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 7: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (95)

    Woman looking over the top of a crochet cowl with picot single crochet stitch bobbles


    Row 8: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 9: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (95)
    Row 10: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 11: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (95)
    Row 12: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 13: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (95)
    Row 14: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 15: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (95)
    Row 16: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 17: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (95)
    Row 18: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 19: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (95)
    Row 20: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)
    Row 21: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the 1st ST, *CH 1, SK 1, HDC* repeat until end of row.  (95)
    Row 22: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)

    flat lay image of crochet cowl with a bobble texture made using picot single crochet stitch.


    Row 23: CH 1 and turn.  *SC in the first ST and PSC in the next ST* across until 1 ST remains.  SC in the last ST. (95)
    Rows 24 – 25: CH 1 and turn.  HDC in the first ST and each ST across. (95)

    FO and leave a long tail to seam the cowl together.  Block your work using your preferred blocking method.  Thread your tapestry needle on to the yarn tail and seam the two short ends of the cowl together using mattress stitch or your preferred seaming method.

    Disclaimer:

    Feel free to sell the item created by this pattern but please provide pattern credit back to me when posting online, and please provide a link to my blog: www.theloopylamb.com.  Please do not resell, distribute, duplicate, or share this pattern in any printed or digital form, claiming this pattern as your own original design.  Please do not use my photos when selling your finished items.   

    I’d love to see your finished items!  Please share your finished makes by tagging the pattern on Ravelry, sharing it to our Facebook page or Instagram.  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest 

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheLoopyLamb
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    While you’re here, don’t forget to check out some of my other great free crochet patterns. If you like cowls and earwarmers, you may be interested in these:

  • Crochet Book Reviews

    Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares Book Review

    Cover of the book Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Thanks to Annie’s Craft Store, I was given the opportunity to review one of their newest crochet book releases: Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares by Joanne C. Gonzalez and I have a copy of the book to giveaway to one lucky reader! Keep reading to learn more about this book and how you can enter to win a copy of your own.

    Annie’s has provided a copy of this book to me free of charge in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

    Pin this for later HERE.

    Waterfall crochet is a technique that was new to me when I received my copy of the book to review and I was very intrigued to learn more. The granny squares on the front of the book are beautiful and feature a lot of colourwork in their designs so I was interested to see how this technique would work. Waterfall crochet is a method that utilizes chain spaces left intentially in the design to create a long cable stitch through. By doing this, colours are worked for a full round rather than a few stitches and carried along the back of your work until their needed next. A technique that limits colour changes and weaving in ends? Where do I sign up?

    Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares includes the patterns for 20 different ganny squares that use the waterfall crochet technique. The long cable stitches create kind of a lattice through the chain spaces and it leaves a decently clean back side to the fabric as well. The patterns all use a worsted weight (4) yarn so it is easy to mix and match your favourite colours using readily available yarns.

    Crochet granny square from the book being reviewed.
    This is the square from Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares that I tried

    I always love the look of granny squares with intricate colour designs but unfortunately, once I finish them, they’re relagated to the WIP pile for a while until I have time to weave in the ends. I couldn’t wait to give this technique a shot so I picked a square and got to work.

    I started with reading the reference section to learn how to do the special stitches in the designs. I kind of got the jist of what wasa going to be happening and decided to go for it. I picked a square with two colours to work on and the center was one in on colour and the remainder of the main body of the square was done in another. Creating the base/body of the granny square was quick and easy and I finished it in less than 30 minutes. Now, onto the waterfall crochet technique.

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Completed blanket project from the Waterfall Crochet Granny Square book.
    Completed blanket project from the Waterfall Crochet Granny Square book.

    For the last round of my square, I changed to my second colour and crocheted around the outside but my block was divided into 4 by chain spaces. To do the waterfall technique, I had to work through the chain spaces of 7 rounds to create one long cable stitch the interweaves through the chain spaces. It was a bit tricky at first, especially because I didn’t have a tunisian or afghan hook available (which is recommended in the book for this part but says it’s not required) but I was able to accomplish it with a regular crochet hook. My tension in the cable would have been better had I used a longer hook so if you’re using this book and doing the longer sets of cables used in the patterns, I’d definitely recommend having an afgahn or long tunisian hook handy for that part.

    My waterfall crochet granny square I made using this book.
    My waterfall crochet granny square I made using this book.

    After I did my first set of waterfall crochet cables, I got the rhythm of the technique and thought it was so cool! Seeing how the cables work and interweave with the fabric was super interesting and I can’t wait to try this technique again.

    This book and technique are suitable for intermediate level crocheters. I recommend printing the resource section out and having it next to your pattern page as you work until you get the hang of the technique. I found this helpful and it saved me the time of flipping back and forth. And definitely don’t skip the resource section of this one. Even if you’ve done a hundred granny squares, you’ll probably find something there you’ll need to reference so definitely a must-read for this book. The book also comes with special access to a video that shows parts of the patterns that may be tricky. This is available upon request to Annie’s to those that purchase the book. Instructions on how to get access are included in the book. I didn’t personally see the video but I wanted to mention that it is available so if you’re wanting to check it out but are nervous about not having video to help you out, that is an option.

    Overall, I think this is a really cool technique and I really enjoyed learning it and trying out the designs in the book. The granny squares in this book are used to create a blanket design but my favourite part about granny squares is that you can use them for so much more than that. Mix and match the designs, use them to creat pillows, scarfs, etc. and create something unique. Once you have the patterns for the squares, the only limit is your imagination.

    If you want to purchase a copy of Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares by Joanne C. Gonzalez, you can check it out HERE.

    If you enjoy crochet pattern books, you can check out some more of my crochet book reviews on my blog:

    Waterfall Crochet Book Giveaway

    Thanks to Annie’s Craft Store, I have a PDF copy of the book Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares by Joanne C. Gonzalez to giveaway to one lucky winner!

    The Waterfall Crochet Granny Squares Giveaway on The Loopy Lamb is open to worldwide participants and ends Friday, October 9th, 2020 at 11:45pm Eastern Standard time.

    To enter, use the King Sumo form below. If you are on mobile and have difficulty entering, please use a desktop computer to enter. Only the Email option is mandatory – all other tasks are optional, for bonus entries only. Please note that by entering your email below, you are subscribing to The Loopy Lamb email list. We will not send you spam, just notifications about new free crochet patterns, news and giveaways.

  • How To's

    Picot Single Crochet & Granule Stitch Tutorial

    Picot Single Crochet Tutorial images
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    If you can do. the single crochet stitch and do a chain, then you can. do the Picot Single Crochet Stitch! Picot Single Crochet Stitch is a variation of the single crochet stitch that creates a beautifully textured fabric that looks like tiny bobbles.

    The Picot Single Crochet Stitch is abbeviated in patterns as (PSC). The different between the basic single crochet and the Picot Single Crochet stitch is quick and easy to accomplish. The PSC needs to be worked from the wrong side of the fabric so that the picots will pop out on the right side of the fabric. You’ll often see the PSC worked with a row of single crochet (or other row of stitches) in between them. When rows of the Picot Single Crochet Stitch are alternated with rows of single crochet stitches, it is referred to as the Granule Stitch.

    Pin this Stitch Tutorial for later SAVE

    The Picot Single Crochet can be used in a variety of different ways but for today’s tutorial, I’ll show you how to do the Picot Single Crochet stitch as it is worked in the Granule Stitch. If you need to learn how to do the Single Crochet Stitch, you can find that tutorial HERE.

    Watch my video tutorial for the Granule & PSC Stitch here:

    Picot Single Crochet & Granule Stitch Multiples

    If you want linear picots (ones that line up, straight up and down), you’ll need to create a starting chain with a multiple of 2 +1+1. To stagger your picots as typically done with Granule stitch, you’ll need to start with a multiple of 4+1+1 for the turning chain.

    Picot Single Crochet:

    Step 1: Insert hook into indicated stitch, yarn over hook and pull through stitch. 

    Step 2: Yarn over and pull through one loop on the hook three times. 

    Step 3: Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook.

    Granule Stitch with Staggered Picots

    Row 1: Chain a multiple of 4+1+1 for the turning chain. I used 18 for my starting chain. SC in the 2nd CH from the hook and remaining CH. Ch 1 and turn.

    Base row and stitch multiple of Picot Single Crochet Stitch

    Row 2: SC in the first ST, *PSC in the next ST, SC in the next ST* repeat instructions contained in the ** until end of row. CH 1 and turn.

    Granule Stitch Step 1
    Picot Single Crochet Step 2
    Step 3

    Row 3: SC in the first ST and each ST across. CH 1 and turn.

    Row 4: SC in the first and 2nd STS * PSC, SC* until one ST remains. SC in the last ST. CH 1 and turn.

    Row 5: SC in the first ST and each ST across

    Repeat Rows 4 and 5 until you reach your desired length.

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Granule Stitch with Linear Picots

    Row 1: Chain a multiple of 2+1, +1 for the turning chain. My starting chain is 18. SC in the 2nd CH from the hook and remaining CH. Ch 1 and turn.

    Base row and stitch multiple of Granule stitch

    Row 2: SC in the first ST, *PSC in the next ST, SC in the next ST* repeat instructions contained in the ** until end of row. CH 1 and turn.

    Picot Single Crochet Tutorial
    Granule Stitch Step 2
    Picot Single Crochet Step 3

    Row 3: SC in the first ST and each ST across. CH 1 and turn.

    Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until you reach your desired length.

    Granule Stitch Swatch with Linear Picots on the bottom and offset Picots on the top.

    That’s it! The PSC and Granule Stitches are fun and easy. You can practice using the Picot Single Crochet Stitch in my Picot Me Up Ear Warmer and Cowl Set Pattern.

    I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest so you can be kept in the loop on all the latest updates and sneak peaks.

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheLoopyLamb
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  • Product Reviews

    Swish Worsted Weight Yarn Review

    Swish Worsted Yarn from We Crochet in three different colours with a lime furls crochet hook.
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    I was recently sent some Swish Worsted Weight yarn from We Crochet (crochet.com) for a design and I decided to share with you my experience working with it in this Swish Worsted Weight Yarn Review.

    This yarn was provided to me free of charge but all opinions are my own.

    Pin this for Later Save

    Swish Worsted Weight Yarn in Wonderland Heather, Cobblestone Heather, Rainforest Heather. and Copper
    Swish Worsted Weight Yarn (from left to right) in Wonderland Heather, Cobblestone Heather, Rainforest Heather. and Copper

    Swish Worsted Weight is, like the name suggests a worsted weight, size 4 yarn. Swish Worsted weight is sold in 50g skeins and a 50g skein contains 100 yards of yarn. This yarn is 100% fine superwash merino wool which means it is machine washable and dryable. Let’s get into the knitty gritty of the label before we get into the review so we know more about what we’re talking about.

    We Crochet Swish Worsted Weight:

    • Current Number of Colourways Available: 33. Check them out HERE.
    • Fiber Content: 100% Fine Superwash Merino Wool
    • Weight: 4 (medium)
    • Ball Size: 50g
    • Yardage: 100 yd / 91.44 m
    • Suggested Hook Size: 5.5 – 6.5 mm (I – K)
    • Suggested Needle Size: 4 – 5.5mm (US 6 – 9)
    • Crochet Gauge: 11 – 14 scs = 4″
    • Knitting Gauge: 4.5 – 5 sts = 1″
    If you’re planning on buying some Swish Worsted Weight Yarn, please consider doing so through this affiliate link. It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free yarn reviews like this one and free crochet patterns.

    First off, I want to talk about just how many colourways are available for this yarn. I got to try 4 different colourways and they were all absolutely beautiful. I got Wonderland Heather, Copper, Cobblestone Heather, and the Rainforest Heather. I am a total sucker for a beautifully heathered yarn and these are no exception. The Wonderland Heather and the Rainforest Heather were my favouriets. The heathering just adds so much depth to these colours and I just can’t get enough of them. There are a few other coloursways I’ve got my eye on on their site because I’m probably going to need to make a few more things soon with this yarn.

    rainforest heather yarn close up
    close up image of wonderland heather swish worsted weight yarn

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Check out the video review of We Crochet’s Swish Worsted Weight yarn:

    How Does It Feel?

    I hear from a lot of people that they are hesitant to order yarn online because they want to be able to touch the yarn. I get it. I’m a serial yarn squisher and have definitely put off some online orders just because I wasn’t sure if I would like how it felt.

    Throw any ideas of scratchy wool out the window because this yarn is buttery soft. According to the We Crochet site, it’s made using a high grade merino wool (20.5) microns. This is the high end of the fine merino wool grading scale which means it’s really soft but still very durable and can be suitable for outerwear garments, if that’s your thing. This yarn is so soft, that I’d be confident making something for a baby to wear next to skin without concern that it would be irritating to their skin. I have a pattern coming out soon using this yarny delight and I’ve worn these items next to skin and it was absolutely delightful.

    Drape? Stitch Definition?

    I absolutely loved working with Swish Worsted Weight. It has good stitch definition without being too soft or to harsh. And the drape? Lovely. Just lovely. I used a 5mm crochet hook for my design and after I blocked it, I fell in love. I am hoping to start another design with it soon with a larger hook and I can’t wait to get started. I can just imagine what it’ll look and feel like and it’s dreamy.

    Close up image of the stitch definition in a crochet swatch using this yarn

    If worsted weight yarn isn’t necessarily what you’re after, We Crochet also offers this yarn in DK and Bulky weights. They also have Swish Fingering weight but that’s only available in bare yarn currently. I loved this yarn and the fact that it’s machine washable means that it’ll be working it’s way into my regular rotation of faves that I reach for when crocheting.

    Thanks for checking out my yarn review. Have you tried Swish Worsted Weight yarn yet? What did you think? What would you make with it? Let me know what you thought in the comments below!

    Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest to see all my newest content, behind the scenes sneak peeks and be the first to know when I’m hosting giveaways.

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    While you’re here, you may like checking out some of my other reviews:

  • Crochet Patterns

    Free Crochet Flamingo Pattern for Flikka Flamingo

    crochet flamingo made with faux fur yarn sitting upright
    This free crochet flamingo pattern has been sponsored by Clover USA. This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Flamingos have been pretty popular recently and when We Crochet came out with a pink colourway of the Fable Fur yarn that I love, I knew I was going to use it to make a free crochet flamingo pattern. Flikka Flamingo is a baby flamingo that just begs to be cuddled. This pattern uses basic shaping and stitches so it can be made quickly and easily.

    This free crochet flamingo pattern has been sponsored by Clover USA. All opinions are my own.

    Pin it for later Save

    Flikka Flamingo’s head, neck and body are made in a single piece and the wings are made separately. The legs and beak are made with worsted weight yarn in separate pieces. The pieces work up quickly and you’ll have a finished crochet flamingo in no time.

    Pink Fable Fur with the crochet flamingo made with this free crochet pattern

    If you haven’t used faux yarn to crochet amigurumi before, free crochet flamingo pattern is a great pattern to finally give it a try. Faux fur yarn is incredibly forgiving so if you don’t have the tidiest seaming when putting your toy together, no one can tell. The fur hides it all and still looks great. Check out my tips and tricks for using faux fur yarns in the video below (or find the write up HERE) so you can hit the ground running. If you’re looking to give faux fur yarns a try, I recommend using Fable Fur from WeCrochet (found HERE). It’s my favourite faux fur yarn as it has a thick strap on the back of the yarn which helps you feel the stitches, even if you can’t see them.

    If you haven’t seen my other faux fur yarn crochet patterns that I’ve published so far, check them out here: Kaya the Koala, Crochet Koala Keychain, Seth the Sloth, Otis the Owl and Salty the Seal.

    Flikka Flamingo sits up on his own with the assistance of a weighted base made with Poly Pellets/weighted beads added to the bottom of the body. You can find the written tutorial for how to create a base for your amigurumi project using Poly Pellets HERE or watch the video below.

    Flikka’s legs are not stuffed to make it easier for him to sit up on his own. I think the floppy legs just make him silly and fun. You can choose to stuff his legs if you wish but it may affect how well he sits.

    Get an ad-free PDF version of this crochet seal pattern HERE on Ravelry or HERE on Etsy.

    Skill Level:

    • Intermediate

    Supplies:

    If you’re planning on buying the materials for this project, please consider doing so through this affiliate link. It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free crochet patterns like this one.

    Abbreviations:

    Special Stitches

    SC3TOG/ SC Three Together: Insert hook into first stitch, yarn over and pull through stitch.  Two loops on hook.  Insert hook into second stitch, yarn over and pull through stitch.  Three loops on hook.  Insert hook into third stitch, yarn over and pull through stitch. Four loops on hook.  Yarn over and pull all four loops on hook.  Stitch completed.


    Finished size:

    • Approximately 12.5” Tall from tips of feet to top of head

    Gauge:

    • Faux Fur Sections: 2 sts x 2 rows = 1 inch
    • Leg and Beak: 6 sts x 6 rows = 1 inch

    Notes:

    • This pattern is worked in continuous rounds (unless stated otherwise).  Do not join at the end of the row, unless indicated.  A stitch marker is used to keep track of the beginning of the round.
    • All pieces made in the Fable Fur are worked and sewn onto the project with the wrong side facing out to show the better-looking side of the fur. 
    • For a cleaner SCDEC, do your SCDEC under the front loops only of each stitch rather than under both loops.  This is often referred to as an invisible decrease.  Find my tutorial on how to do this HERE.
    • Gauge is not critical to the project but it may affect the amount of yarn needed.
    • A weighted base is added to the bottom of the flamingo to assist it with sitting up on its own.  This is optional but may affect whether the toy can sit up on its own.  Find a tutorial on how to create a weighted base for your toy HERE.

    Free Crochet Flamingo Pattern for Flikka Flamingo

    Close up of the face of the crochet flamingo

    Beak

    Round 1: Using 3.5mm hook and Brava Worsted in Black, make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Round 2: (SCINC) x 6 (12)
    Round 3: SC around (12)
    Round 4: (SCINC, SC 5) x 2 (14)
    Round 5:  SC around (14)
    Round 6: (SCINC, SC 6) x 2 (16)
    Round 7: SC around (16)
    Change to White
    Rounds 8 – 12: SC around (16)
    FO leaving a long tail to sew onto face.  Add some stuffing to the nose and sew onto face between eyes.

    Head & Body

    Round 1: Using 5.5mm hook and Fable Fur in Volpe, make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Round 2: (SCINC) x 6 (12)
    Round 3: (SCINC, SC) x 6 (18)
    Round 4:  SC 1 (SCINC, SC 2) x 5, SCINC, SC (24)
    Rounds 5 – 10:  SC around (24) – Place safety eyes in Round 6 with 4 STS between them.
    Round 11: SC 1 (SCDEC, SC 2) x 5, SCDEC, SC (18) – Start adding stuffing.  Adding a bit more each round.
    Round 12: (SCDEC, SC) x 6 (12)
    Rounds 13 – 16: SC around (12)
    Round 17: (SCINC, SC) x 6 (18)
    Round 18: SC 1 (SCINC, SC 2) x 5, SCINC, SC (24)
    Rounds 19 – 24: SC around (24)  – If using a weighted base, add it to the body at the end of Round 24.
    Round 25: SC 1 (SCDEC, SC 2) x 5, SCDEC, SC (18)
    Round 26: (SCDEC, SC) x 6 (12) – Finish stuffing.
    Round 27: (SCDEC) x 6 (6)

    FO and use the tail to close up the whole.  Weave in ends.


    amigurumi flamingo made with faux fur yarn

    Legs (Make 2)

    Round 1: Using 3.5mm hook and Brava Worsted in Black, CH 9. SC in the 2nd CH from the hook and the next 6 CHS.  SC 3 in the last CH.  Working up the other side of the chain, SC 6, SCINC in the last CH (18)
    Round 2: SC in each ST around (18)
    Round 3: (SC 2, SCINC) x 6 (24)
    Rounds 4 – 6: SC around (24)
    Round 7: (SC 2, SCDEC) x 6 (18)

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.


    Rounds 8 – 9: SC around (18)
    Round 10: (SCDEC) x 6, SC 6 (12)
    Round 11: (SCDEC) x 3, SC 6 (9)
    Round 12:
    SCDEC, SC 7 (8)
    Rounds 13 – 31: SC around (8)
    Join last ST to first ST with a SL ST.  FO leaving a long tail to sew onto bottom of the body.  Do not stuff.  Sew the legs onto the bottom of the body.

    crochet flamingo sitting on a ledge

    Wings (Make 2)

    Row 1: Using Volpe and 5.5mm crochet hook, make a MC and SC 3 into the MC.  (3)
    Row 2: CH 1 and turn. SCINC, SC, SCINC. (5)
    Row 3: CH 1 and turn. SC across. (5)
    Row 4: CH 1 and turn.  SCINC, SC 3, SCINC (7)
    Rows 5 – 7: CH 1 and turn.  SC across (7)
    Row 8: CH 1 and turn. SCDEC, SC 3, SCDEC (5)
    Row 9: CH 1 and turn.  SCDEC, SC, SCDEC (3)
    Row 10: CH 1 and turn. SC3TOG (1)

    Place a wing on either side of the body, with the pointed end facing the back of the bird.  Sew onto body and add stuffing between the wing and the body before closing up and finishing off.


    Your Flikka Flamingo is now complete! I hope you enjoyed this free crochet flamingo pattern! If you like flamingos, you may want to check out my Flaming-to-go Flamingo Cup Cozy Pattern or my free flamingo crochet pattern round up. Find a listing of all my free crochet patterns HERE.

    Disclaimer:

    Feel free to sell the item created by this pattern but please provide pattern credit back to me when posting online, and please provide a link to my blog: http://www.theloopylamb.com.  Please do not resell, distribute, duplicate, or share this pattern in any printed or digital form, or claim this pattern as your own original design.  Please do not use my photos when selling your finished items.   

    I’d love to see your finished items!  Please share your finished makes by tagging the pattern on Ravelry, sharing it to our Facebook page or Instagram.  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest 

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  • Crochet Book Reviews

    Crochet Cafe by Lauren Espy Book Review

    Crochet Cafe by Lauren Espy next to some furls crochet hooks and yarn.
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    I’ve got another amigurumi book to review this week and I am very excited. Recently, I had the opportunity to review Whimsical Stitches by Lauren Espy and the book this week is by the same designer. The book we’re talking about this week is called Crochet Cafe: Recipes for Amigurumi Crochet Patterns. I really enjoyed Lauren’s last book so I couldn’t wait to dive in to see what Crochet Cafe had in store.

    Thanks to Paige, Tate & Co., they have provided me a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review of this book. All opinions are my own.

    Pin this for later SAVE

    The cover of this book is beautiful. It has preview images of many of the patterns contained in the book. All the patterns are of kawaii foods and drinks and this book is meant to mimic a recipe book. It’s a cute concept and the cover makes me think of a cute but trendy cook book I’d definitely want to take a look at in the book store.

    cover image of Crochet Cafe by Lauren Espy
    amigurumi apples featured in Crochet Cafe

    Crochet Cafe starts off with a reference section and the very first page of that reference section shows the reader how to identify the difference between the right side and the wrong side of the project. I think that’s a great addition as it’s a question that comes up often from crocheters but you rarely see covered. Another fun technique I saw included which you don’t see spoken about often is melting the backs of safety eyes. Lauren is sure to advise extreme caution when pursuing this because, as I have learned from experience, things can get dicey doing this, fast, if you aren’t very careful.

    Check out my video review of Crochet Cafe:

    Continuing in the fashion of her last book, Whimsical stitches, this book is chalk full of clear and well-done photography to walk you through not just every stitch/technique in the book, but also in the patterns themselves.

    Crochet Cafe is broken down into meal sections, just like a cook book. So the sections are:

    • Breakfast
    • Lunch
    • Dinner
    • Snacks and,
    • Dessert
    Amigurumi Avocado toast and Avocado patterns inside Crochet Cafe

    The projects are absolutely adorable and it’s hard to know where to start first or to pick a favourite. As I’m writing this, I’m looking at the pattern for Bacon, Eggs & Toast and I’m thinking “Girl, shut up! That toast is way too cute! Annnd now I want to eat bacon.” Some of my favourite designs in the book were:

    • Lobster & Corn on the cob
    • Spaghetti & Meatballs
    • Pie and ,
    • Chinese Takeout Shimp Lo Mein (because I defy you to resist those little shrimps!)

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Lobster & Corn on the cob in the book being reviewed

    The patterns were well written and simple to follow, supported by a plethora of beautiful images to walk you through each pattern. If I want to be nit picky, my only thing is that the yardage amounts for the yarns aren’t provided and the exact yarns/colours weren’t provided. There was a shade of green used in one of the patterns that I really liked and would have liked to use the exact yarns she used to make my project but it isn’t the end of the world. This is by no means a deal breaker for anyone. I am a prepper and just like to know how much yarn I’ll need exactly and I like to match what’s used. But, if you don’t follow gauge (which I know many crocheters do with amigurumi), it may have been considered better to just leave it out. So, not a big deal.

    Besides that, the attention to detail and cute little extras are really what makes this book fantastic. There’s a little butter dish to go with the lobster and corn! How stinkin’ cute is that?! And the little shrimp? I can’t even start. If I had to describe this book in two words, it would be: absolutely adorable.

    If you want to check out Crochet Cafe: Recipes for Amigurumi Crochet Patterns by Lauren Espy you can grab a copy of the book HERE.

    Follow Lauren Espy, the author/designer of this book on Instagram: @amenagerieofstitches.

    If you enjoy crochet pattern books, you can check out some more of my crochet book reviews on my blog:

  • Product Reviews

    July 2020 Knitcrate Unboxing & Review

    July 2020 Knitcrate contents
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    The July 2020 Knitcrate came a bit later than expected but as my husband said, better crate than never. The purple tonal yarn that came in the July 2020 Knitcrate is absolutely gorgeous and worth the wait. Keep reading to see my review and grab your exclusive coupon code to save on Knitcrate.

    Pin this for Later Save

    I was so excited to find out that this month’s yarn was 100% organic pima cotton. I love pima cotton yarns and the tonal purple colour on this yarn is gorgeous! I have to hide it from my daughter or else she’s going to want it for her.

    If you haven’t tried Knitcrate before, it’s a monthly subscription service that sends you hand-dyed yarns, a pattern book (1 crochet pattern, 1 knitting pattern) using those yarns and a little extra something fun. This month’s little extra was a 6.0mm tunisian crochet hook. Since I am learning to do tunisian crochet, I was super excited to see this. There was also an added bonus pattern using this yarn and the tunisian crochet hook so I may give that one a whirl.

    Purple yarn that came in the July 2020 Knitcrate

    Use code “LOOPY20” to save 20% off your first Knitcrate

    The July 2020 Knitcrate was done in collaboration with Michelle Costa of Stitch & Hustle and the yarn selection was awesome. As I said about, it’s a 100% organic pima cotton. The yarn, is a DK weight and each 100g hank (there were two in the box) has 266 yards/242 m of yarn. It’s machine washable but needs to be lain flat to dry. The yarn colour has wonderful depth and it is dreamy and soft.

    Check out my unboxing of the July 2020 Knitcrate

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    July 2020 Knitcrate Pattern Book and Extra

    The patterns in the book this month are all shawls. There is a knit shawl, a crochet shawl and a bonus pattern for a tunisian crochet shawl. I’m not personally a big shawl person but I’m personally tempted to make the tunisian shawl to test my new tunisian skills and I’ll possibly gift it to a family member that would put it to good use.

    If you’re interested in checking out Knitcrate for yourself, you can do that HERE and don’t forget to use LOOPY20 at the check out to get 20% off your first crate.

    While you’re here, you may like checking out some of my other yarn reviews:

    Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest to see all my newest content, behind the scenes sneak peeks and be the first to know when I’m hosting giveaways.

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  • Crochet Patterns,  Feature Maker

    Free Crochet Doll Pattern by Craftings of Joules

    Amigurumi doll and reindeer made with this free crochet doll pattern
    This post may contain affiliate links.

    This week I’m excited to share a free crochet doll pattern from Julia Chiang of Craftings of Joules named Violet the Schoolgirl Doll. Julia is sharing this free pattern with you all today as part of my Featured Maker Program which aims to introduce you to other designers and help you get to know them a bit better.The links to Julia’s social media profiles are at the end of the post so please go give her some love and a follow as a thank you for the free crochet doll pattern.

    Julia Chiang of Craftings of Joules holding a cat
    Julia Chiang of Craftings of Joules

    Hi! I’m Julia, a yarn obsessed college student who drinks a little too much tea and reads anything and everything! I began my amigurumi journey this past winter with a small amigurumi whale, and I haven’t stopped since. My favorite things to crochet are dolls (as you see here) and animals, as well as the odd amigurumi food! Aside from crochet, I also love making modular origami stars to create hanging galaxies in my room

    Tell me a little bit about yourself. 

    I’m a college student based in Massachusetts with a deep love of books and creating things with my hands. Ever since I was little, I’ve enjoyed any kinds of arts and crafts that are tactile in some way—be it working with clay, building Legos, or origami. Funnily enough, I’ve never had too much interest in 2D art like drawing or painting. It might be because I have less of a natural proclivity for it, but as a strong believer in practice over talent, I think it must just be because I love the feeling of creating tangible objects more.

    Origami stars hanging from string made by Julia Chiang of Craftings of Joules
    Origami Stars made my Julia

    How long have you been crocheting?

    I picked up crocheting relatively recently, just over half a year ago. Interestingly, I’ve known about amigurumi for a long time and had been too intimidated to try for a long time, even though I adored the end result.

    Are there any other crafts that you enjoy doing?

    I’ve dabbled in many forms of art over the years, but my main creative outlet for the longest time was origami. Paper crafts are beautiful and the geometric shapes that can be created out of crisp paper and sharp folds are almost incomprehensible to the eye, the reason why I have been fascinated with them for so long. Similar to crocheting, origami is made out of one element, which can be endlessly manipulated to become a 3D creation, or a part of a larger whole.

    How did you learn to crochet?

    I first discovered crochet and amigurumi when I came across the most adorable stuffed bears online during a school break. At first I was convinced that I could never learn how to make anything as complicated-looking as amigurumi, but the very next day I went to Michael’s and picked out my first crochet hook and ball of yarn. After a few days of failure and restarts, I finished my first amigurumi— a little blue whale! Even though it was far from pretty, it was enough to make me fall in love with the craft.

    What is your favourite thing to crochet?

    If you haven’t picked it up already, my favorite things to create are amigurumi! They are the reason why I first learned to crochet, and honestly I still see garments and home decor items as the icing on top of the crochet cake. The ability to create any kind of plushie is magical to me, and the limits of yarn are almost endless. As someone who has long been a follower of patterns (whether origami or amigurumi), the ability to turn the tables and be an artist through yarn is also especially empowering. I also just think that amigurumi are really cute, and appreciate that they are relatively quick to make compared to the weeks-long projects that clothing items tend to be.

    When did you start pursuing a business as a maker and why?

    I started pursuing a business as a designer four short months ago in the middle of the summer. I had started sharing patterns on Instagram and wanted to create a larger platform to showcase my work, as well as be able to write more detailed descriptions about my creative process. In the past I have started multiple blogs oriented around writing and books, so starting a blog around my new favorite past time was not a huge stretch of the imagination.

    What are your aspirations for your business?

    My business is still in its early stages, but currently I’m mainly focused on building a larger readership so that I can reach more people with my patterns. I would love it if someday my blog were to be able to sustain at least my yarn-buying habits, if not become a serious side job.

    What tips would you give to someone wanting to start out with a maker business?

    I would advise them to make a serious commitment to investing time and effort into building it up from the start. I often see that on Instagram many crocheters and makers run their accounts casually and set up an Etsy shop on the side, which is totally fine, but if one really wanted to start a business I would recommend that they jump into the deep end head first. It’s difficult enough to establish yourself when you’re giving 100%, so make the commitment to learn how to use different social media platforms, take really professional photos, and go the extra mile with each blog post.

    What’s your favourite yarn/fibre to work with?

    I tend to use DK or sport weight yarn because I mainly create amigurumi. Using lighter weight yarn allows me to create lots of fine details while making sure that the amigurumi doesn’t accidentally turn out humongous. The way I think of it, each stitch is like a pixel on a screen: the more pixels you have, the higher definition the screen ends up being! Of course, this is only true for amigurumi. When making garments honestly I would rather use the fluffiest yarn imaginable just so that I could finish more quickly!

     Who inspires you?  Who are your favourite makers?

    All About Ami is one of my main inspirations because I love the style of her amigurumi designs. She brings so much heart and grace to her work and makes me feel so inspired to do the same.

    Apart from her, @amiguruku and @helloladyellie on Instagram are my favorite makers because of the sheer cuteness of both of their works. The amount of detail and effortless perfection in their creations always blows me away!

    If time and money were not an issue, what would your dream project be?

    I’d love to try making a giant amigurumi out of super bulky yarn! This is definitely something within my grasp, but I just haven’t found the perfect design yet. I think it would be so funny to have a giant and mini version of one of my patterns!

    Anything else you’d like to tell us about?

    In the near future, I’m hoping to create a series of mythological figures out of dolls! I study classics in college, so I’m really excited to be able to reimagine 2000 year old characters in cute plushie form. In less esoteric news, I’m also looking forward to creating a collection of Asian snacks to celebrate both my heritage and love of food 🙂

    You can get an ad-free PDF version of this free crochet doll pattern HERE in Julia’s Etsy shop.

    crochet doll wearing a purse next to a wicker basket
    Voilet the Schoolgirl Doll Free Crochet Doll Pattern

    Free Crochet Doll Pattern: Violet the Schoolgirl Doll

    Abbreviations (US):

    Special Techniques:
    Invisible Finish Off: FO leaving a tail that is at least 5 – 6 inches in length.  Thread the tail onto a tapestry needle.  Place the tapestry needle through the top of the 2nd ST from front to back and pull through.  Place tip of needle into top of the last ST of the round, under the back loop of the stitch, and pull through to the back of the work.  Weave in the end.

    Tools and Materials:

    Technical Notes:

    1. Crochet in continuous spiral rounds, unless specified otherwise. Use a stitch marker or piece of yarn to keep track of the last stitch in each round.
    2. When filling with polyester stuffing, pull apart each large chunk into many smaller chunks. This ensures an even distribution of firmness within the amigurumi.
    3. Stuff the head and the body firmly at the openings so that the neck is stable upon completion.
    4. To avoid large holes in the crochet fabric, increase tension until the holes cannot be seen, or choose a crochet hook a size down.
    5. Use sewing pins to secure limbs of the amigurumi before you sew them.
    6. Always use the invisible decrease and invisible finish off (described above).

    Important: Note that this pattern calls for a 2.5 mm hook (except for hair). If you choose to use a larger sized hook, then be prepared for the doll to be oversized​. ​According to this pattern, this doll is 6.5 inches tall (17 cm).

    Voilet the schoolgirl doll made with this free crochet doll pattern

    Legs:​ (in skin color yarn) ​x2

    R1: sc6 in MR (6 sts)
    R2: (sc2, inc) x2 (8 sts)
    R3-11 (9 rounds): sc all around (8 sts)

    Invisible finish off. Make another leg identically but do not finish off or cut the yarn. Stuff both legs lightly, using the back of crochet hooks or chopsticks to push fiberfill inside.

    Connect legs: ch2 off of the first leg, sc all around second leg (8 sts), sc 2 in the chains between legs, sc all around original leg (8 sts) (20 sts total)

    Continue from connected legs to make body:

    crochet doll body that's part of this free crochet doll pattern

    Body (in skin color yarn)

    R1-8 (8 rounds): sc all around (20 sts)
    Begin stuffing.
    R9: (sc8, dec) x2 (18 sts)
    R10: sc all around (18 sts)
    R11: (sc, dec) x6 (12 sts)

    Finish stuffing. Finish stuffing using the back of crochet hook to push fiberfill in, and finish off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

    Head:​ (in skin color yarn)

    R1: sc6 in MR (6 sts)
    R2: inc x6 (12 sts)
    R3: (sc, inc) x6 (18 sts)
    R4: (sc2, inc) x6 (24 sts)
    R5: (sc3, inc) x6 (30 sts)
    R6: (sc4, inc) x6 (36 sts)
    R7: (sc5, inc) x6 (42 sts)
    R8-15 (8 rounds): Sc all around (42 sts)

    crochet doll body without arms or face

    If you wish to, place 6.0 mm safety eyes between round 10 and 11 (middle of head), 7 stitches apart. However, I suggest placing safety eyes at the very end if you don’t mind not being able to secure the safety eyes to be able to arrange the face more easily.

    R16: (sc5, dec) x6 (36 sts)
    R17: (sc4, dec) x6 (30 sts)
    R18: (sc3, dec) x6 (24 sts)

    Finish stuffing.

    R19: (sc2, dec) x6 (18 sts)
    R20: (sc, dec) x6 (12 sts)
    Cut yarn, leaving a short tail. Using a needle, thread the yarn through all 6 stitches in the last round, and pull it tight so the opening closes like a drawstring bag. Finish off and weave in the end.

    Arms​: (in skin color yarn) ​x2

    R1: sc6 in MR (6 sts)
    R2-12 (11 rounds): sc all around (6 sts)

    Do not stuff. Invisible finish off and weave in ends, leaving a tail for sewing. Attach arms to the left and right of the body.

    crochet doll arms
    body of a crochet doll

    Dress (top half):

    (in white) ​worked in turned rows until R7. Chain 1 and turn at the end of each row until then.

    R (row) 1: FSC 18, chain and turn (18 sts)
    R2: (sc2, inc) x6, chain and turn (24 sts)
    R3: (sc3, inc) x6, chain and turn (30 sts)
    R4: (sc4, inc) x6, chain and turn (36 sts)
    R5: sc6, ch6, sk6, sc12, ch6, sk6, sc6, chain and turn (36 sts)
    R6: sc6, sc3 in the chains, sc12, sc3 in the chains, sc6 (30 sts)


    Put what you have so far on the doll by fitting the arms in the armholes, with the opening at the back of the doll. Cut the yarn and sew the dress closed. Begin crocheting (by making a standing crochet stitch) at the seam and begin round 7, crocheting in the round (no longer in rows).

    in continuous roundsR7-8 (2 rounds): sc all around (30 sts)

    The yarn I used (Lion Brand Babysoft) was significantly thinner than the yarn I used for the body section, so if you use the same weight of yarn as the body you may need to stop here and move on to the next section. If the yarn you’re using is also relatively thin (see picture below), then continue.

    R 9-10 (2 rounds): sc all around (30 sts)

    unfinished amigurumi doll pattern
    Front View
    back view of the amigurumi doll
    Back View



    Dress (skirt):​ (in light purple)

    R1: (sc2, inc) x10 (40 sts)
    R2-5 (4 rounds): sc all around (40 sts)
    R6: (sc3, inc) x10 (50 sts)
    R7-9 (3 rounds): sc all around (50 sts)

    If the yarn you used for the skirt is equal weight to the body, then you may want to stop here. If not, then finish this pattern because the yarn I used for the lower part of the skirt was particularly thin.

    R10-12 (6 rounds): sc all around (50 sts)

    Invisible finish off. Weave in end.

    Sleeves:​ (in white)

    R1: work standing crochet stitch in left arm hole and crochet all around (9 sts)
    R2-4: sc all around (9 sts)
    Invisible finish off. Weave in ends, and repeat on the right side.

    Hair:

    Use hook 0.5-1.0 mm bigger and hair color yarn The hair is going to be built from a circle 24 stitches around, with hair strands coming from that circle. If you refer to the diagram, you can see that the circle is split into 2 sections (A and B). We will begin at the beginning of section A, which comprises 6 of the 24 stitches of the circle, and move on to section B, completing the circle around.

    Circle:

    R1: sc6 in MR (6sts)
    R2: (inc) x6 (12 sts)
    R3: (sc, inc) x6 (18 sts)
    R4: (sc2, inc) x6 (24 sts)

    Invisible finish off, and weave in end. Make standing crochet stitch/Attach the yarn anywhere in the round to begin crocheting hair.

    Section A: Strands 1-6 (6 strands): ch 20, sc 19 back (beginning from second chain from hook), sl st in next stitch.

    Section B:

    Strands 7-24 (9 strands): ch21, hdc 19 (beginning from third chain from hook), slst x2

    ● This section only has 9 strands but covers 18 stitches in the round because each strand covers 2 stitches in the circle (because of the two slip stitches).

    drawing of how to do the doll hair made with this free crochet doll pattern

    Cut yarn and weave in the end. To create straight hair, block hair by pinning it down on a foam mat and using a steam iron and leaving it overnight to dry. If you don’t have a steam iron, you can just soak it in water and lay it out to dry. Different blocking methods can be found ​here​.
    After blocking, pin the circle on top of the doll’s head. Half of section A is to the left of the doll’s face, and the other half is to the right. Pin down each of the hair strands and create texture by putting the strands directly in front of the dolls face over the hair on either side. Either sew or glue the hair down to the head with craft glue.

    Crossbody bag:​ (in dark purple) ​worked in turned rows

    R1: FSC 3, ch, turn. (3 sts)
    R2-7 (6 rows): Sc all across, ch, turn (3 sts)

    Fold in half and sew down the sides to close the purse. Ch 30 from one side of the purse to create the strap and sew the strap end to the other side of the purse.

    Final touches:

    1. Insert 6.0mm safety eyes between rounds 10-11, 7 sts apart
    2. Embroider a nose one row below the eye line, covering two stitches.
    3. Embroider eyebrows directly above the eyes using one ply of brown yarn (pull yarn apart into separate plies) or embroidery thread. The eyebrows are diagonals, 3 stitches across and one up. The bottom of the eyebrow is 3 rows above the eye (and the top of the eyebrow is 4 rows above).
    4. Embroider pink lines one row below eyes (across two stitches) for blush.

    Violet the Schoolgirl Doll is all done! I hope you enjoyed crocheting her and found this free crochet doll pattern helpful. I would love to see your finished amigurumi, so share a picture on Instagram with me by using the #craftingsofjoules and tagging me @craftingsofjoules. Once again, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to reach out to me with a direct message on Instagram or through email at craftingsofjoules@gmail.com. Happy crocheting! ♥

    Find Julia on Social Media!

    You can find some of Julia’s other work and give her a thanks for the free crochet doll pattern on the sites below:

    Blog: craftingsofjoules.com
    Instagram: @craftingsofjoules

    Disclaimer:

    Feel free to sell the item created by this free crochet doll pattern but please provide pattern credit back to Julia Chiang of @craftingsofjoules when posting online.  Please do not resell, distribute, duplicate, or share this pattern in any printed or digital form, or claim this pattern as your own original design.  Please do not use her photos when selling your finished items.   

  • Crochet Book Reviews

    Crocheted Wreaths for the Home Review

    Picture of the cover of Crocheted Wreaths for the Home
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    The fall season is coming up and one of the things that makes me think of fall is wreaths. I don’t really see too many wreaths in the summer around here but when fall hits, they really start to make their debut. It seems appropriate that in light of this, I’m reviewing the book Crocheted Wreaths for the Home by Anna Nikipirowicz. Thanks to Search Press, they have provided us with a copy of the book to giveaway to one lucky winner so keep reading to learn you you can possibly win a copy for yourself.

    This book was provided to me free of charge in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

    Pin this Crocheted Wreaths for the Home Review for later SAVE

    Crocheted Wreaths has patterns for 14 different seasonal wreaths that you can crochet. You could potentially get many other wreaths by mixing and matching the components to create your own custom wreaths. Some of th wreath patterns included are:

    • Valentine Wreath
    • Autumn Wreath
    • Berry Wreath
    • Halloween Wreath
    • Christmas Wreath
    • Summer Wreath
    • Easter Wreath
    • and more.
    Inside cover of the crocheted wreaths for the home book

    Most of the wreaths use a premade wreath form as the base of the wreath and the crochet patterns provided are for the various components added to the wreath and assembly instructions. Each wreath pattern has a mini project that can be made with one or more components of the wreath pattern. For example, One of the pumpkins from the halloween wreath can be used to make a pumpkin pincushion and the author gives instructions for how to do that. The patterns are written in the UK terminology. The UK/US terminology conversion chart hs been included to aid those that may not be familiar working in the UK terminology.

    The yarns used in the books are popular in the UK and Europe and may need to be ordered online for North American readers that want to use the exact yarns in the book. The yarn weights used range from lace to light worsted. Other yarns could be substituted if you are able to match guage or keep in mind that you may have a finished project that is much larger (or smaller) than expected if you are substituting yarn weights.

    crocheted wreaths found inside the book

    The resource section in the back of the book is helpful covering techniques used in the book like how to crochet an i-cord, crocheting with beads, crocheting with wire, blocking your pieces and more. This section is well illustrated and explained although, does not cover all the techniques in the book. There are no basic stitch demonstrations or explanations in the book so you will need to have at least an intermediate level of crochet knowledge in order to pick up this book and start working with it. There are brief written explanations of how to do some the stitches in an abbreviations section at the front of the book but this wouldn’t be enough for most beginners.

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    This book is suitable for intermediate to advanced level crocheters. The patterns offer a lot of variety and you can create some stunningy detailed crocheted wreaths with them. If crocheted wreaths are your thing, this resource has the patterns to provide you with a diffferent wreath for every new season. The elements of the patterns could be mixed and matched to create a wide variety of different and customized wreaths beyond those given in the book.

    If you’re interested in purchasing a copy of Crocheted Wreaths for the Home you can find it HERE.

    crochet halloween wreath

    If you enjoy crochet pattern books, you can check out some more of my crochet book reviews on my blog:

    Giveaway!

    Thanks to Search Press, I have a copy of the book Crocheted Wreaths for the Home by Anna Nikipirowicz to giveaway to one lucky winner!

    The Crocheted Wreaths for the Home Giveaway on The Loopy Lamb is open to participants in the U.S., Canada and U.K. and ends Friday, September 25th, 2020 at 11:45pm Eastern Standard time.

    To enter, use the King Sumo form below. If you are on mobile and have difficulty entering, please use a desktop computer to enter. Only the Email option is mandatory – all other tasks are optional, for bonus entries only. Please note that by entering your email below, you are subscribing to The Loopy Lamb email list. We will not send you spam, just notifications about new free crochet patterns, news and giveaways.

  • Product Reviews

    Bernat Blanket Breezy Yarn Review

    Three balls of Bernat Blanket Breezy and Bernat Blanket Breezy Watercolor yarn
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    During my last trip to Michaels, I got a bunch of new yarns and as always, I wanted to share my experience with these yarns with you. The new yarn I’m talking about this week is Bernat Blanket Breezy. This yarn was released around the time that the pandemic hit here in Canada and I am finally able to give it a try and see what it’s all about. I love Bernat Blanket yarn so I knew I was going to have to give this new Bernat Blanket Breezy yarn a try eventually.

    Pin this for Later Save

    Before we get into the nitty gritty of the review, let’s go over the yarn label info so you can get an idea of what we’re talking about:

    Bernat Blanket Breezy & Breezy Watercolour:

    • Current Number of Colourways Available: 2 Solid-colours in the Breezy and 8 variegated colourways in the Breezy Watercolour. The Yarnspirations website shows that the Blanket Breezy is a self-striping yarn and is available in 10 different colourways there. Check them out HERE.
    • Fiber Content: 100% Polyester
    • Weight: 4 (medium)
    • Ball Size: 250g
    • Yardage: 530 yd / 484 m
    • Suggested Hook Size: 5 mm (H)
    • Suggested Needle Size: 5mm (US 8)
    • Crochet Gauge: 12 sc x 13 rows= 4″
    • Knitting Gauge: 16 sts x 20 rows = 4″
    Bernat Blanket Breezy yarn in blue

    When I picked up my Bernat Blanket Breezy and Breezy Watercolour yarn, I was lucky enough to find it on sale for $5.99 Canadian ($11.99 regular price). Looking at the Michaels site today, it looks like this product is being cleared out, likely to make way for the new Bernat Blanket Breezy yarn found on the Yarnspirations site that has the product changing from solid or variegated coloured yarns to a self-striping cake. If there’s anything Bernat is known for, at least in my mind, it’s their self-striping yarn cakes.

    This yarn is a boucle-style yarn and it’s really light weight. It doesn’t really feel like a medium weight yarn when you’re working it up. It feels smaller than that. Because of the boucle, you’re going to be getting almost zero stitch definition. I did a swatch in this yarn using single crochets, half double crochet and double crochets and didn’t love it. If anything, I’d probably make my entire fabric in single crochets, just to make it simple. I work with faux fur yarns a lot and I found locating the stitches in this yarn more difficult than with fur yarns. This is due to the face that the thick strand on the fur yarn is missing from this product and so you can’t rely on feeling your stitches like I do with fur yarn. If being able to see your stitches as you work is something that is a make or break it point for you, then this isn’t going to be worth the investment for you.

    Blanket Breezy yarn and a furls Crochet hook

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Check out the video review of this Bernat Blanket Breezy yarn:

    Bernat Blanket Breezy Watercolor
    Bernat Blanket Breezy Watercolor is a variegated yarn

    The yarn is soft and has some pretty and enticing colours. I bought 3 balls in shades that would work well together but ultimately, I don’t know if I enjoy it enough to go back to it any time soon. I’d rather stick with my beloved normal Bernat Blanket or Bernat Blanket Stripes and enjoy making my project than to work with something I just didn’t love.

    What do you think? Have you seen this yarn? Have you tried this yarn? What would you make with it? I’d love to hear from you and know what your thoughts are so leave me a comment in the comment section below.

    While you’re here, you may like checking out some of my other reviews: