• How To's

    How to Crochet the Lemon Peel Stitch

    Lemon peel swatch in a flat lay with text overlay indicating how to crochet the lemon peel stitch
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    The Lemon Peel Stitch is such a fun and relaxing stitch to crochet that has a great texture. I love using this stitch for a variety of different projects but it’s fabulous for crocheting in front of the t.v. The Lemon Peel Stitch is really easy to crochet and great for beginners. I’ve got both a photo and video tutorial for us today so let’s grab our hooks and our yarn and let’s learn how to crochet the Lemon Peel Stitch.

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    close up of the lemon peel stitch texture in yellow yarn

    You can use any hook and yarn combination with this stitch but today I’ll be using a Furls Odyssey 5.5mm crochet hook and a Brava Worsted Weight Yarn from We Crochet. You can mix up your hook and yarn weights to change up the look of this stitch.

    Check out my How to Crochet the Lemon Stitch video tutorial here:

    Abbreviations:

    Stitch Multiple:

    • Chain any even number of CHs

    How to Crochet the Lemon Peel Stitch

    Row 1: SC in the 2nd CH from the hook. DC in the next CH. *SC in the next CH, DC in the next* across the chain, SC in the last CH. In my example here, I started with a CH 12 and at the end of Row 1, I have 11 sts.

    First step of the lemon peel stitch tutorial - CH 12
    Single crochet in the second CH from the hook
    double crochet done in the 3rd ch from the hook

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Row 2: Turn and CH 1. *SC in the first ST, DC in the next * repeat instructions in asterisk ** until one CH remains. SC in the last CH.

    lemon peel stitch tutorial row 2
    double crochet stitch completed

    Repeat Row 2 until you have reached your desired size.

    completed lemon peel stitch swatch

    That’s it! Super simple right? This stitch is great for dishclothes, bags, blankets and so much more!

    Ready to practice using this stitch? Try My Elgin Tote and Coffee Cozy Free Crochet Patterns HERE.

    Want to learn something else? Check out these other great free crochet tutorials:

  • Product Reviews

    Ottlite Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp Review

    Ottlite Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp illuminating a crochet swatch and ball of yarn.
    This post may contain affilliate links. All opinions are my own.

    This week I was offered the chance to review a cool product that is not just great for the office, but great for crafters: the Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp from Ottlite. I know what you’re thinking “Sanitizing desk lamp?!”. That’s right, friends. The Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp has features that will apparently sanitize your desk, which I know is a big area of concern for us as we work our way through this pandemic. Keep reading to learn more about the light, and how you can enter to win one for yourself.

    Pin this for later HERE.

    The Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp is a beautiful, sleek lamp that sits on your desk and has the ability to fold flat for storage. It has two points that hinge so that you can adjust the light to your preference. It comes with a USB port, accessible on the base so that you can plug in your phone to charge it. There is another model, called the Purify Santizing Desk Lamp that has QI wireless charging if that’s more up your alley. I love how sleek the lamp is and it is really light-weight so when I’m crocheting in different rooms and I need that added light, it’s no issue for me to take it with me.

    As a crafter with light sensitivity issues, I had heard that Ottlites were great for reducing eyestrain so I couldn’t wait to give this light a try. According to the Ottlite site, the LED bulbs used in their lights have been shown to reduce eyestrain by up to 51%. That’s pretty significant when you consider how much screen time we all get and even more so when you have light sensitivity issues. I used this light almost daily for a period of almost 2 weeks and didn’t have any issues working close to it like I did with my old desk lamp. This arrived right at the perfect time for me actually because I was working on a large project with black yarn and it helped me see the stitches perfectly without me ending up with a massive migraine by the end of it. The light on the Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp is dimmable which was a great feature for me so when I need to adjust the light level when I do have a migraine, I can do that and continue my work.

    Illuminated crafting lamp, lighting up a plant and ball of yarn

    In addition to the dimmable light, this Ottlite model has three different light settings: ClearSun only (regular light), Clear Sun & SpectraClean (regular light and the santizing light together) and SpectraClean only (which is just the sanitizing light). These modes are changed via the little touch sensor on the base and easily switched through. The SpectraClean mode turns on a purple light in the lamp which is supposed to sanitize your work space.

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Does the Ottlite Emerge Sanitize?

    So the Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp is from this new series of lights from Ottlite that are aimed at sanitizing your workspace and are being launched during a pandemic, which makes my inner skeptic wake up and start paying attention. As I’m not a scientist and have no way of testing whether or not the technology is actually sanitizing my workspace or the hooks I left under it just in case it does work, I can’t say for certain. If the light is killing bacteria like they claim it does, then my crochet hooks have never been cleaner.

    Ottlite Emerge LED Sanitizing desk lamp in sanitizing mode
    Ottlite Emerge LED lamp in sanitizing mode

    I tried to find some independent, scientific studies that prove this light safely sanitizes stuff (which would satisfy the inner skeptic) but came up short of the marketing material offered for the lights. So the jury is still out whether it actually works as a santization device but I feel that I should remind everyone that handwashing with soap and water or cleaning your work space/tools with proper cleaners is a scientifcally proven way to protect yourself from germs.

    Overall, I love the light and have thoroughly enjoyed using it when I crochet in the evenings. I’m crocheting with dark yarns at night like it’s nothing and prior to the Ottlite, I would reserve those project to daylight hours only. If you’re interested in checking out the Emerge Sanitizing Desk Lamp or one of the other Ottlite lamps, you can check them out HERE.

    Win an Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp

    The lovely folks over at Ottlite are giving one of my followers a chance to win their very own Emerge LED Sanitizing Desk Lamp! The giveaway is happening over on my IG page and starts at 3pm EST and can be found HERE. This giveaway is in no way affiliated with Instagram and is open to U.S. entrants only. Giveaway closes Friday, March 12, 2021. Winner will be contacted via Instagram.

    Looking for more product reviews for crocheters? Check out some of my other reviews here:

  • Crochet Book Reviews

    Crochet Tops by Salena Baca Review and Interview

    Cover Image of Crochet Tops: 26 Simple Patterns for First-Time Sweaters, Shrugs, Ponchos & More by Salena Baca
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    This week I had the opportunity to review a brand new book called Crochet Tops: 26 Simple Patterns for First-Time Sweaters, Shrugs, Ponchos & More by Salena Baca. Not only did I have an opportunity to review the title, I got a chance to interview the author so we can learn more about her and her new book. Salena has also given us a copy of Crochet Tops to give away to one lucky winner so keep reading to learn how to enter to win a copy for yourself.

    This book was provided to me free of charge in exchange for my honest review.

    Pin this for later HERE.

    Ashley: When and how did you learn to crochet?

    Salena: I learned in kindergarten when I was about 5 years old. I attended a Waldorf style school and crochet was part of the curriculum. We all learned by making props for our first school play (goat horns, for the Three Billy Goats Gruff).

    Ashley: How many other books have you written to date?

    Salena: I’m currently working on my 8th book! 6 are currently available or on pre-order, and the other 2 should be out in 2022. You can view them all (including individual patterns) on ravelry, here:  https://ravel.me/4f7rdf 

    Ashley: Where did your inspiration for this book come from?

    Salena: From my own desire to learn how to crochet clothes. As a crocheter, this meant I had to have a better understanding of yarn, fabric, tension, drape, style, fit, stitches, and techniques. As my crochet clothing style developed, so did my crochet skills. And so, the idea to compile a skill-building crochet book featuring clothes seemed like a great resource to make and share.

    Ashley: How long does it take to complete a book like this?

    Salena: Every book is different, but the range is typically 18-30 months. My portion (from conception through project production) takes about 12 months. Post production (editing, proofing, layout), takes about 8 months.

    Ashley: What’s your favourite design in the book and why?

    Salena: That’s really hard to say! But, the ones I’ve continued to wear are the Tweed Sweater (it’s comfortable, and flattering), Hock Poncho (the yarn is gorgeous and I always get compliments), Sprightly Vest (it’s so fashionable, and easy to wear in the summer).

    Ashley: What is the process like when you design a pattern?

    Salena: When I design clothing, I always start with a style concept that I want to add to my wardrobe. I might get inspired by a new style from a magazine or clothing store, and think about how I can create something similar in crochet. Fit and style are important, because the fabric you’re creating is with those in mind (that’s where an understanding of yarn, gauge and drape come in). Pairing a yarn and stitch pattern together is crucial, and many times I have to try a few yarn types before I get the right match for a design. Next, I create samples in my own size, so that I can get a feel for how they work, and decide what the size range can be (not everything translates to smaller or larger sizes). When I’m finally ready to write instructions, I find spreadsheets are helpful with grading and double-checking my equations. Designing clothes, especially in various sizes, is a complex job! 

    Ashley: How would you say your crochet or designing has changed since you first began writing/design crochet books?

    Salena: I’m far more technical now that I was before my first book! Design work takes creativity, but the real artistry, for me, is in seeing crochet patterns like math equations. This not only helps my process, but it gives me a sense of accuracy and precision that I find very satisfying. I’ve never seen myself as a designer, and I actually shy away from that term in this industry; I’m a technical writer!

    Ashley: What do you hope the biggest take away for makers will be from your book?

    Salena: I hope this book helps to provide a skill-building in crochet, and empowers more crocheters to make things that they love wearing.

    Ashley: Do you have any other exciting projects on the horizon you’d like to tell us about?

    Salena: Yes! I teach at the American Crochet Association, and one of my favorite courses is about pattern writing, here: https://www.americancrochetassociation.com/p/crochet-pattern-writing

    My goal is to help crocheters to help themselves, so that crochet can be passed through the generations in better hands than we found it.

    Find Salena on social media:
    Ravelry
    Salena Baca’s Facebook Group

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Crochet Tops Review

    As the title of Crochet Tops suggests, this book contains 26 patterns for crochet tops. The book is laid out in a way that the tops work in progressive difficulty levels, building on skills used in earlier top patterns. The beginning of the book discusses this fact and walks through swatching, matching gauge, blocking and yarn substitutions. I think it’s great that a section on yarn substitution is included as this is something that can be confusing for makers and getting the substitution right in a crochet garment can make or break your project. The tops are created using basic shapes and stitches and work into different techniques like motifs and more involved stitch patterns and added panels.

    The garments in Crochet Tops are pretty and offer a variety of styles. There are sleeveless tops, cardigans, vests, tees, sweaters and lots of ponchos. In fact, 8 of the 26 patterns in Crochet Tops are ponchos. All the yarns in the book are available from most big-box stores that sell yarn or online so I like that fact as I think it makes the book more accessible than others that use specialty/hard to find yarns.

    The sizes included in the book vary from small to XXL. One thing that I thought was missing from this book that would have really taken it to the next level is a section on sizing, measuring your body and selecting the appropriate size for you. If you’re spending the time making yourself a garment, you want to make sure that the hours spent doing so, are going to yeild results that you’re happy with. Some of the patterns include bust sizes, while others include just panel sizes. Missing this component could cause some confusion for first time garment makers that may think that the sizes provided in the book will be the same as their standard retail sizing and/or, don’t know how to measure themselves properly to ensure you’re making the correct size. I did this with my very first garment I ever made. I made a garment in a 2XL and it ended up being HUGE. I didn’t have a proper bust measurement to compare against the pattern and after spending hours making it, I was disappointed. Not understanding ease and the difference between your bust measurement and the finished bust measurement could also cause some frustration with a first time garment. If the top you’re making is meant to be oversized and flowy but you pick a size with a finished bust measurement that matches your actual bust measurement, you’re not going to get the intended fit. So if you’re checking out this book and this is your first garment make sure you really pay attention to the sizing provided in the book, specifically those finished measurements that are provided to ensure you’re picking the right size for yourself. If you want to learn more about ease and measuring yourself, check out this guide from the Craft Yarn Council.

    The patterns in the book are clear and easy to understand. The resource section in the back of the book covers abbreviations and written instructions for stitches but lacks images to support the stitches. There is also a section that provides sources for online learning and direct support from the designer. This is so nice to see in a book. I get a lot of requests from readers for pattern support on books I’ve reviewed and sometimes tracking down the authors to assist readers can be troublesome since some don’t have social media profiles or contact information that’s easily located. I think providing that to readers right in the book is really great and shows that even if you find something tricky, the author is ready and willing to support you even after your purchase.

    I think this book is best suited to experienced crocheters that are looking to either start their first garment or is looking for a collection of crochet tops to reference in order to build their own handmade wardrobe.

    If you’re interested in checking out Crochet Tops: 26 Simple Patterns for First-Time Sweaters, Shrugs, Ponchos & More by Salena Baca you can purchase copies HERE.

    If you enjoy crochet pattern books, you can check out some more of my crochet book reviews on my blog:

    Crochet Tops Book Giveaway

    Thanks to the author, we’re giving away a copy of the Crochet Tops: 26 Simple Patterns for First-Time Sweaters, Shrugs, Ponchos & More by Salena Baca. to giveaway to one lucky winner!

    This pattern giveaway on The Loopy Lamb is open to U.S. participants only(except where void by law) and ends Friday, March 19th, 2021 at 11:45pm Eastern Standard time.

    To enter, use the King Sumo form below. If you are on mobile and have difficulty entering, please use a desktop computer to enter. Only the Email option is mandatory – all other tasks are optional, for bonus entries only. Please note that by entering your email below, you are subscribing to The Loopy Lamb email list. We will not send you spam, just notifications about new free crochet patterns, news and giveaways.

  • How To's

    Invisible Finish Crochet Tutorial

    Collage of crochet tutorial images with text overlay indicating it's an invisible finish crochet tutorial
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Today I am going to share with you my invisible finish crochet tutorial. This technique can be a game changer for amigurumi and projects made in the round. I personally love using this technique for colour changes and finishing off open edges in amigurumi projects. This is a great substitutuion for It’s quick and easy to do and, like the name suggests, invisible. Let’s get started.

    When finishing off a project in the round, you’ll generally be asked to join the last stitch and the first stitch with a slip stitch. This can sometimes leave a bump and a noticeable jog between the start and the end of the row. Using the invisible finish crochet technique, you can help eliminate that job and made the edge of your project look smoother and have a more even finish.

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    The invisible finish technique can be used with almost any stitch but for today’s tutorial, I’m using single crochet and double crochet examples. We’re starting off here using the invisible finish with an amigurumi project made in single crochet stitches.

    Watch the video version of this Invisible Finish Crochet Tutorial here:

    Invisible Finish for Open Edges in Amigurumi Projects

    Step One: Finish your last stitch of your round but DO NOT join. Cut your yarn to have a tail about 6 – 8″ long and pull the yarn through your last stitch. Thread the tail onto a tapestry needle.

    step one of the invisible finish crochet tutorial

    Step Two: Skipping the first stitch of the round, insert your needle under both loops of the second stitch of the round and pull the yarn to the back/inside of the project.

    step two of the invisible join
    replicating the stitch with yarn tail

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Step Three: Insert the needle through the top of the last stitch of the round, under the back loop of the stitch and pull the yarn to the back/inside of the project. Pull the yarn until it replicates the first stitch of the round without being too tight or sagging. We want it to look exactly as if it’s the first stitch of the round and not your yarn tail.

    tapestry needle going under the Back Loop of the last stitch
    final step of the invisible finish crochet tutorial

    Step Four: Weave in your end to help keep your duplicate stitch in place and keep they yarn from unravelling. Trim any excess.

    completed invisible finish

    That’s it’s! As you can see, duplicating that first stitch of the round helps even up the two sides of the project and make that closure less noticeable. If you do a lot of amigurumi projects, then I recommend doing this to finish off your project or to do this technique to help make colour changes less noticeable in amigurumi projects.

    I hope you found this tutorial helpful. If you have any questions, please leave me a comment below and I’ll do my best to help you.

    Want to learn something else? Check out these other great free crochet tutorials:

  • Crochet Patterns

    Free Crochet Teddy Bear Pattern

    hands holding a furry crochet bear that was made with this free crochet teddy bear pattern
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    This week, I have a free crochet teddy bear pattern to share with you to make my little friend named Bearrison Bear. Bearrison is a quick and easy crochet teddy bear made with faux fur yarn. The faux fur yarn elevates this simple project to give it a store-bought look and it’s just way too cute.

    Do lose it! Pin it for later Save

    After I released my patterns for my crochet bear ornament and my teddy bear lovey, I got a lot of requests for a classic teddy bear so I wasted no time getting work on a free crochet teddy bear pattern for you all. While I was working on this pattern, my son came over and asked me if I was making a “Bearrison” which is the name he gave to his favourite teddy bear. Bearrison is an important part of our lives and I thought it would be fun to name this little guy Bearrison too. Once I told my son that yes, this would be a Bearrison too, there was no discussion as to where Bearrison would be ending up after I took photos of him. My son loves his new Bearrison and has even taken it to school for show and tell.

    This free crochet teddy bear pattern is worked with simple crochet stitches and shaping. I used We Crochet’s Fable Fur for this design and it’s my absolute favourite faux fur yarn. The names of the colours of Fable Fur yarns are all named in different languages for the word “bear” so I kind of enjoy that this teddy bear is made in the colourway bear, when translated to english anyways.

    close up image of the furry teddy bear face

    Tips for Working with Faux Fur Yarns

    If this is your first time making faux fur amigurumi, don’t be intimidated. Faux fur yarn is incredibly forgiving so even if you think you’ve made a mistake, the odds are, it’ll be hidden by the fur. I recommend that first time faux fur yarn users check out my tips & tricks for working with faux fur yarns video below. I’ve included my tops tips & tricks for working with faux fur yarns, some of which, are amigurumi pattern specific. If you’d prefer the written version of the video, you can check that out HERE.

    Other Free Crochet Patterns Using Faux Fur Yarns:

    If you haven’t seen my other faux fur yarn crochet patterns that I’ve published so far, check them out here:

    hand holding a faux fur teddy bear made with this free crochet teddy bear pattern

    Skill Level:

    • Easy


    Terminology:

    • U.S. Terminology

    Supplies:

    If you’re planning on buying the materials for this project, please consider doing so through this affiliate link. It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free crochet patterns like this one.

    Abbreviations:

    • CH = Chain
    • FO = Finish Off
    • MC = Magic Circle
    • SC = Single Crochet
    • SCDEC = Single Crochet Decrease
    • SCINC = Single Crochet Increase
    • SL ST = Slip Stitch
    • ST = Stitch


    Finished Size:
     

    • Approximately 8” tall

    Gauge: 

    • 4 sts x 5 rows = 2”

    You can purchase an inexpensive ad-free PDF version of this crochet teddy bear pattern for a small fee HERE on Ravelry and HERE on Etsy.


    Notes:

    • Gauge is not vital to project as long as the same tension is maintained throughout the project and there are no holes that stuffing can be seen through in the bear parts.  Yarn amounts are based on the gauge given so not matching gauge may affect the amount of yarn needed for the project. 
    • A 5.5mm crochet hook is recommended but if you find you are unable to feel your stitches with the fur, you can adjust your hook until you can more easily feel your stitches to know where to place your stitches.  This may however affect your gauge and therefore, the amount of yarn needed. 
    • Parts are crocheted in continuous rounds (unless stated otherwise).  Do not join at the end of the row, unless indicated.  A stitch marker is used to keep track of the beginning of the round.
    • All pieces made in the Fable Fur are worked and sewn onto the project with the wrong side facing out to show the better-looking side of the fur. 

    Disclaimer:

    Feel free to sell the item created by this pattern but please provide pattern credit back to me when posting online, and please provide a link to my blog: https://www.theloopylamb.com.  Please do not resell, distribute, duplicate, or share this pattern in any printed or digital form, or claim this pattern as your own original design.  Please do not use my photos when selling your finished items.   

    Free Crochet Teddy Bear Pattern: Bearrison Bear

    amigurumi bear made with faux fur yarn, next to a ball of fable fur and a furls crochet hook

    Head & Body

    Round 1: Make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Round 2: (SCINC) x 6 (12)
    Round 3: (SC, SCINC) x 6 (18)
    Rounds 4 – 8:
    SC around (18) – Place safety eyes in Row 4 with 2 sts between them
    Start adding stuffing, adding a bit more as you work.
    Round 9: (SC 1, SCDEC) x 6 (12)
    Round 10: (SCDEC) x 6 (6)
    Round 11: (SCINC) x 6 (12)
    Rounds 12 – 18: SC around (12)
    Round 19: (SCDEC) x 6 (6)
    FO leaving a long tail to sew up the hole.  Add a bit more stuffing and sew up the hole.  Weave in ends.

    Nose

    Round 1: Make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Rounds 2 – 3: SC around (6)
    Join last ST for the first ST with a SL ST. FO, leaving a long tail to sew onto the face of the bear.  Put safety nose through the center of the MC of the nose, add a bit of stuffing and sew onto the face just below the eyes. 

    Ears (Make 2):

    Round 1: Make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Join the last ST to the first ST with a SL ST.  FO leaving a long tail to sew onto the head.  Sew each ear onto the head.

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Arms (Make 2)

    Round 1: Make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Rounds 2 – 7: SC around (6)
    FO leaving a long tail to sew onto body.  Lightly stuff.  Sew onto either side of the body, just below the neck.

    Leg (Make 2)

    Round 1: Make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)
    Rounds 2 – 7: SC around (6)
    FO leaving a long tail to sew onto body.  Lightly stuff.  Sew onto either side of the body.

    Finishing:

    Use your scissors to trim the fur lightly around the nose and eyes so that the fur doesn’t obstruct them.  This is an optional step but helps make his features more visible.

    I’d love to see your finished items!  Please share your finished makes by tagging the pattern on Ravelry, sharing it to our Facebook page or Instagram.  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest 

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheLoopyLamb
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      www.instagram.com/TheLoopyLamb
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    Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/theloopylamb
    Newsletter: Sign up for my newsletter!

  • Product Reviews

    Gansey Style Crochet Afghan Review & Giveaway

    Gansey Style Crochet Afghan hanging over the edge of a table
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Thanks to our friends at Annie’s Craft Store, I have at copy of the Gansey Style Crochet Afghan pattern by Lena Skvagerson to giveaway to one lucky winner. Before we get to the giveaway, I’ll let you know a bit more about the pattern you can enter to win.

    Pin this for later HERE.

    The Gansey Style Crocher Afghan is a gorgeous, highly textured crochet afghan. The sample for this pattern is made in a simple colour but I think it would be beautiful as a striped project as well. This is a great project that offers a lot of variety/interest with different types of textured stitches.

    Materials used in the Gansey Style Crochet Afghan Pattern:

    • Yarn: This pattern uses 11 balls of Patons Canadiana worsted weight yarn
    • Hooks: 6mm (J) crochet hook or hook needed to obtain gauge
    • Tapestry Needle
    • Locking Stitch Marker

    Size:

    • 44″ wide and 50″ long

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this one skein crochet hat pattern for free.

    Skill Level

    • The skill level in this pattern is listed as Intermediate

    This pattern is absolutely accessible to intermediate crocheters that have experience using a variety of textured stitches like Front Post and Back post stitches, working in the third loop of half double crochet stitches and different types of puff and bobble stitches. The blanket is beautiful and one of those projects that could become an heirloom.

    If you want to purchase a copy of the Gansey Style Crochet Afghan by Lena Skvagerson, you can check it out HERE.

    If you enjoy crochet pattern books, you can check out some more of my crochet book reviews on my blog:

    Gansey Style Crochet Afghan Pattern Giveaway

    Thanks to Annie’s Craft Store, I have a PDF copy of the Gansey Style Crochet Afghan by Lena Skvagerson to giveaway to one lucky winner!

    This pattern giveaway on The Loopy Lamb is open to worldwide participants (except where void by law) and ends Friday, March 5th, 2021 at 11:45pm Eastern Standard time.

    To enter, use the King Sumo form below. If you are on mobile and have difficulty entering, please use a desktop computer to enter. Only the Email option is mandatory – all other tasks are optional, for bonus entries only. Please note that by entering your email below, you are subscribing to The Loopy Lamb email list. We will not send you spam, just notifications about new free crochet patterns, news and giveaways.

  • Product Reviews

    We Crochet CotLin Yarn Review

    Hand holding a ball of We Crochet CotLin yarn with a crochet swatch, word overly indicating a yarn review
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    It’s another Yarn Review Saturday here and today we’re taking a look at some We Crochet CotLin Yarn. I’ve been working on some spring designs and exploring some new yarns that are great for spring and summer, and CotLin is one of the yarns I’ve been checking out. So I thought I’d share with you my experience working with CotLin yarn with you today. Check out last week’s cotton blend yarn review of Comfy Worsted HERE.

    This yarn was provided to me free of charge in exchange for my honest review.

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    Before we get into our yarn review, let’s go over the yarn label information so we know what we’re talking about here:

    We Crochet CotLin Yarn:

    • Current Number of Colourways Available: 45. Check them out HERE.
    • Fiber Content: 70% Tanguis Cotton, 30% Linen
    • Weight: 3 (Dk)
    • Package Size: 50g
    • Yardage: 123 yd / 50 m
    • Suggested Hook Size: 4.5 – 5.5mm (G+ – I)
    • Suggested Needle Size: 3.75 – 4.5mm (US 5 – 7)
    • Crochet Gauge: 12 – 17 scs = 4″
    • Knitting Gauge: 5.5 sts = 1″
    • Care: Machine washable, tumble dry low
    If you’re planning on buying some We Crochet CotLin Yarn, please consider doing so through this affiliate link. It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free yarn reviews like this one and free crochet patterns.

    Check out the video review of We Crochet CotLin yarn:

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    We Crochet CotLin Yarn in a bowl next to a hand making notes about a crochet swatch

    We Crochet CotLin yarn comes in an impressive array of beautiful colours. I knew I was going to want to design something for summer with this yarn so I got a bunch of CotLin yarn in the colour Cyan. I am a total sucker for this colour so when I saw it was an option, it became the only option for me in that moment. The colour is bold and fantastically vibrant. I love it.

    Now this yarn came to me in the same box as the Comfy Worsted yarn that I reviewed last week. Both of these yarns are cotton blends but they have totally different feels to them. The CotLin doesn’t have that instant soft, squish appeal as the Comfy Worsted does, but to be fair, Comfy Worsted is made with Pima Cotton and that’s pretty hard to beat or be compared to.

    Working with CotLin was great. I didn’t have any issues with splitting and the fabric created in my swatches were softer to touch than the yarn was in while in the ball. I did two different swatches with this yarn as I usually do: one with basic stitches and one with tunisian stitches. Stitch definition was great on both swatches. The tunisian sample felt softer than the basic stitches after finishing my swatches. I have no idea why that is but it’s just something I observed. What I’m really excited to see is how this yarn will feel after washing it a few times. Linen tends to soften the more you wash it.

    Crochet swatch in simple stitches using CotLin Yarn
    Tunisian crochet sampe swatch in a flat lay with crochet accessories

    I went full nerd when doing my reviews of cotton yarns because I wanted to learn all about the benefits of different cottons, what some of their properties were and ultimately just learn as much as I could about them. I won’t get into the nitty gritty of everything I learned but I’ll give you some facts I learned that made me SUPER excited to use CotLin for a summer wearable design this year. Tanguis Cotton (the cotton used for CotLin) is a really strong and absorbant cotton. Garments made with tanguis cotton are known for being more breatable because this cotton absorbs and releases moisture quickly. Pair those qualities with linen, which is known for being breathable and keeping you cool, summer garments made in CotLin will likely be a dream to wear. And the more you wear and wash them, the softer they’ll get. I doubt my hands can crochet fast enough to keep up with my excitement about this.

    Besides garments, this yarn would be fantastic for bags. Super strong, durable and comes in a variety of gorgeous colours? Sounds like everything I look for in a yarn for bags! I can’t wait to get started on my project using this yarn. In fact, I’m going to go get started on that now. Happy Hooking friends!

    Thanks for checking out my yarn review. Have you tried CotLin yet? What did you think? What would you make with it? Let me know what you thought in the comments below!

    If you’re intersted in giving CotLin yarn a try, check it out HERE.

    Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest to see all my newest content, behind the scenes sneak peeks and be the first to know when I’m hosting giveaways.

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  • Crochet Patterns

    Free Amigurumi Doll Clothes Pattern – CAL Week 3

    collage of photos showing a crochet boy doll and clothes made with this Free Amigurumi Doll Clothes Pattern
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Welcome back to our third and final part of our My Pal Pascal crochet along! This week I’ve got a free amigurumi doll clothes pattern for you all. Pascal was feeling a little cold so it’s time to dress this guy up! Grab your hooks and yarn and let’s finish this thing! Woo! I hope you’ve had a great time during this crochet along. I’ll be hosting another one soon so if you’d like to make a suggestion on what we make for the next free crochet along, make sure to leave a comment below or let me know in the Loopy Lamb Crochet Community.

    The free amigurumi doll clothes pattern for My Pal Pascal has been split into three parts to make creating him a little more manageable and so you can crochet along with us. Please reference the posts below for each part of the CAL and instructions.

    ***Join the My Pal Pascal Crochet Along Here! Add this design to your Ravelry queue HERE!

    Pin this Free Amigurumi Doll Clothes Pattern for later Save

    This week we are using this free amigurumi doll clothes pattern to dress our friend Pascal. We’ll be making a t-shirt and a pair of pants for our friend so that he is dressed and ready to play. We’ll be using two different colours of Brava Worsted Weight for this week. I’ve used the colours Avocado for his t-shirt and Solstice Heather for his pants. Feel free to use whatever colours you’d prefer to customize your doll clothes.

    You can purchase an inexpensive ad-free PDF version of this pattern with all three parts together in one convenient file HERE on Ravelry and HERE on Etsy.

    Crochet boy doll wearing crochet doll clothes made with this free crochet pattern

    Free Amigurumi Doll Clothes Pattern: My Pal Pascal – CAL Part 3

    Skill Level:

    • Intermediate

    Terminology:

    • U.S. Terminology

    Supplies:

    If you’re planning on buying the materials for this project, please consider doing so through this affiliate link (or those in the supply list). It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free crochet patterns like this one.

    Abbreviations:


    Finished size:

    • Doll is approximately 9.5” tall

    Gauge:

    • Doll: 5 sts across x 7 rows = 1” square
    • Clothing: 5 sts across x 7 rows = 1” square


    NOTES:

    • This pattern is worked in continuous rounds (unless stated otherwise).  Do not join at the end of the row, unless indicated.  A stitch marker is used to keep track of the beginning of the round.
    • For a cleaner SCDEC, do your SCDEC under the front loops only of each stitch rather than under both loops.  This is often referred to as an invisible decrease. Find my tutorial on how to do this HERE.
    • In Round 1 of the Body, the CH 1 is counted as a ST and should be worked into in Round 2 of the body.
    • Pants are created to fit snuggly on the body without the need of a button.  Take care when pulling over the feet so as not to stretch out the feet and legs. 


    Special Techniques:

    • Invisible Join: FO leaving a long tail. Thread the tail onto a tapestry needle.  Place the tapestry needle through the top of the 2nd ST from front to back and pull through.  Place tip of needle into top of the last ST of the round, under the back loop of the stitch, and pull through to the back of the work.  Weave in the end.


    Shirt

    Using Brava in Avocado and 3.5mm hook, Ch 23
    Row 1: SC in the 7th CH from the hook and each remaining CH across. (17 STs & CH 6 SP for buttonhole)
    Row 2: CH 1 and turn. (SC 2, SCINC) x 2, (SC, SCINC) x 3, SC 2, SCINC, SC 2 (23)
    Row 3: CH 1 and turn.  (SC 3, SCINC) x 2, SC 2, SCINC, SC, SCINC, SC 2, SCINC, SC 3, SCINC, SC 2, SCINC (30)
    Row 4: CH 1 and turn. SC 3, CH 7, SK 8, SC 8, CH 7, SK 8, SC 3 (14 STS & 2, CH 7 SPS)
    Row 5: CH 1 and turn.  SC in each ST and CH across (28)
    Rows 6 – 7: CH 1 and turn. SC across. (28)
    Row 8: CH 1 and turn. (SC 3, SCINC) x 7 (35)
    Row 9: CH 1 and turn.  (SC 6, SCINC) x 5 (40)
    Rows 10 – 14: CH 1 and turn. SC across. Join last ST to first ST with a SL ST. (40)

    FO and weave in ends.  The CH 6’s that created a loop in Row 1 will act as a button hole/fastener to close the back of the shirt.  Using sewing needle and thread, sew button onto the back of the shirt, on the side opposite to the loop created in Row 1. 

    back view of the amigurumi doll clothes on the crochet doll

    Sleeves


    Round 1: With the right side facing you, attach yarn to the center point in the bottom one of the arm holes.  SC 18 around the arm hole.  Join last ST to first ST with a SL ST. (18)
    Rounds 2 – 5: CH 1 and turn. SC in each ST around. Join last ST to first ST with a SL ST. (18)
    FO and weave in ends. Repeat instructions on the second sleeve.

    Crochet boy doll wearing shorts made with this Free Amigurumi Doll Clothes Pattern

    Pants

    Pant Leg 1:

    Using Brava in Solstice Heather and 3.5mm hook, CH 16, join last CH to first CH with a SL ST, taking care not to twist the CH.
    Round 1: CH 1, SC around.  Do NOT join. (16)
    Rounds 2 – 6: SC around. (16)
    FO.

    Pant Leg 2:

    Using Brava in Solstice Heather and 3.5mm hook, CH 16, join last CH to first CH with a SL ST, taking care not to twist the CH.
    Round 1: CH 1, SC around.  Do NOT join. (16)
    Rounds 2 – 6: SC around. (16)
    Do NOT FO. We will continue on to join the pant legs and create the rest of the pants.
    Round 7: SC in the 1st ST of Round 6 of Pant Leg 1 and PM, SC 15 around Pant Leg 1, SC in 1st ST of Round 6 of Pant Leg  2, SC 15 (32)
    Round 8: SCINC, SC 3, SCINC, SC 7, SCINC, (SC 3, SCINC) x 2, SC 7, SCINC, SC 3 (38)
    Rounds 9 – 14: SC around (38)
    Round 15: SCDEC, SC 34, SCDEC (36)
    FO using Invisible Join (see special techniques).  Weave in ends and put shorts on doll, taking care not to stretch out the feet and legs of your doll.

    That’s it for this free amigurumi doll clothes pattern and this crochet along! I hope you enjoyed making your My Pal Pascal so! If you would like to join the My Pal Pascal Crochet Along and show off your finished foll, please join our Facebook group HERE!  If you’d like to have input on what we make for our next CAL, either leave me a comment below on what you’d like to make or let us know in the Loopy Lamb Crochet Community on Facebook HERE.

    Disclaimer:

    Feel free to sell the item created by this pattern but please provide pattern credit back to me when posting online, and please provide a link to my blog: https://www.theloopylamb.com.  Please do not resell, distribute, duplicate, or share this pattern in any printed or digital form, or claim this pattern as your own original design.  Please do not use my photos when selling your finished items.   

    I’d love to see your finished items!  Please share your finished makes by tagging the pattern on Ravelry, sharing it to our Facebook page or Instagram.  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest 

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheLoopyLamb
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  • Crochet Book Reviews

    Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals Review

    Front cover of Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals in a flat lay with crochet tools
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    This week I checked out Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals by Kristen Rask and I’m going to share my review with you so you know what it’s all about.

    Thank you to Becker & Mayer books who provided this book to me free of charge in exchange for my honest opinion.

    Pin this Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals Review for Later Save

    Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals contains 26 crochet patterns for amigurumi toy animals. The patterns are written by a variety of different designers which I always enjoy seeing and at the back of the book a section with information on where to find the designers was great to see. None of the patterns in the book appear to be designed by the author so my guess is perhaps they were the one that gathered this all together to amalgamate it. The patterns available in this book are:

    MonkeyCow
    BearBeaver
    PigChick
    HedgehogGiraffe
    CatsBird
    FoxKoala
    RaccoonBear Pod
    FawnDog
    SquirrelAlpaca
    KittenPeter Pilot Duck
    MouseOwl
    SkunkBunny
    TortoiseFish
    amigurumi goose found in amiguurmi crochet: farm & forest animals.

    Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals starts off with a resource section where they walk you through the basic crochet stitches and techniques used in the book. I found some of the explanations to be unclear and the instructions for how to do the adjustable ring to be incorrect. The technique they describe, technically works in a way, but is not an adjustable ring. The pictures were a little dark and unclear so I wouldn’t rely on this section to help beginners learn what’s needed to crochet the patterns in the book. Make sure you read the section on “how to read a pattern” or you may be confused reading the patterns due to the way they are written out.

    The materials lists in many patterns were incomplete or incorrect. I found multiple patterns where materials were needed but not listed in the matierials list and other patterns where materials were listed but weren’t used in the pattern. Some patterns had sizes listed for safety eyes, some didn’t and one had the size listed incorrectly. Again, I read the resource section and it noted the patterns are done in DK weight yarn but the material lists in the patterns list the yarns as worsted weight. Technically DK can include light worsted weight yarn and this may be nitpicky but I’d estimate that 9/10 people don’t read the resource section as closely as I did and will end up using a proper size 4 worsted weight yarn and end up with a project that’s bigger than expected. Size information for each toy is given, not that, that matters I guess because none of the patterns actually include gauge information. No yarn information in terms of yardage or brand is given either which was disappointing.

    Image from the book being reviewed in a flat lay with yarn and a crochet hook

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    The patterns in the book include photos to support the patterns and the images are labelled to indicate specific steps. This would be helpful if all the images were needed or helped to clarify the indicated steps. I found myself looking at some of the images you’re directed to reference over and over again trying to understand why it was there. If those specific images weren’t labelled and indicated in the lines of the pattern which direct your attention to the image, fine – they’re there as design elements. But when you are directing my attention away from the pattern and to the image, I would expect it’s adding value or clarifying something, which didn’t always happen. It’s truly a shame because some patterns where these images could have been swapped up to add clarity to some sometimes, confusing or vague instructions would have really helped this book out.

    image of some crochet animals from the book amigurumi crochet: forest & farm animals

    While I was reviewing this book, I couldn’t get past this feeling that I had seen some of these patterns before. The owl in the book specifically looked crazy familiar. So, I did a google search and found that a few other books (and also several kits) have been published using the same patterns in this book. I haven’t read the other titles but based on the images seen on the covers, it appears many of these patterns are also available in other titles.

    I really wanted to like this book. The animals are cute and I always love seeing makers work together on projects like this. Unfortunately, the above noted issues, combined with the inconsistencies I found in the patterns themselves really made it hard to fall in love with. If you’re really into amigurumi and feel capable of filling in some gaps along the way, this book may be something you’d enjoy. Otherwise, I feel many makers, particularly those relatively new to amigurumi maybe be better suited to other amigurumi titles with more support.

    If you are interested in checking out Amigurumi Crochet: Farm & Forest Animals you can find it HERE.

    If you enjoy crochet pattern books, you can check out some more of my crochet book reviews on my blog:

  • Product Reviews

    We Crochet Comfy Worsted Weight Yarn Review

    Comfy Worsted Yarn in a flat lay with crochet hook and accessories
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    It’s another Yarn Review Saturday here and today we’re taking a look at some We Crochet Comfy Worsted Yarn. I’ve been working on some spring designs and exploring some new yarns that are great for spring and summer, and Comfy Worsted is one of the yarns I’ve been checking out. So I thought I’d share with you my experience working with Comfy Worsted yarn with you today.

    This yarn was provided to me free of charge in exchange for my honest review.

    Pin this for Later Save

    Before we get into our yarn review, let’s go over the yarn label information so we know what we’re talking about here:

    We Crochet Comfy Worsted Yarn:

    • Current Number of Colourways Available: 31. Check them out HERE.
    • Fiber Content: 75% Pima Cotton, 25% Acrylic
    • Weight: 4 (Worsted)
    • Package Size: 50g
    • Yardage: 109 yd / 100 m
    • Suggested Hook Size: 5.5 – 6.5mm (I – K)
    • Suggested Needle Size: 4.0 – 5.5mm (US 6 – 9)
    • Crochet Gauge: 11 – 14 scs = 4″
    • Knitting Gauge: 4.5 – 5 sts = 1″
    • Care: Machine wash gentle, tumble dry low
    If you’re planning on buying some We Crochet Comfy Worsted Yarn, please consider doing so through this affiliate link. It helps to support the blog at zero cost to you and allows me to continue to bring you great free yarn reviews like this one and free crochet patterns.

    Check out the video review of We Crochet Comfy Worsted yarn:

    If you would like to support my blog, you can do so by doing your regular shopping on Amazon. As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission on qualifying purchases made through my Amazon link, which in turn helps to support the blog so I can keep bringing you patterns and great content like this for free.

    Here in Canada, I have always struggled to find a really solid cotton yarn that I love for spring and summer projects. The selection in store is dismal so I’m forced to go online for my shopping. When I came across We Crochet’s Comfy Worsted, I knew I had to give it a try. Taking it out of the box, it was love. This yarn is sooo soft and I waited no time to get some hooks into this yarn. Would Comfy Worsted stitch up the way I hoped? I’ve been duped by soft cottons before so I wasn’t going to let myself fall head over heels with it until I had done some extensive stitching with it.

    Two balls of cotton acrylic blend yarn on a large crochet project

    The colours are gorgeous. I got some Comfy Worsted in Hawk, White, Black and Copper. I am OBSESSED with the Copper and Hawk colourways. I don’t know what it is about the Copper specifically that draws me in but I just love it. The yarn has a matte finish so I really like that for garments and given the availability of colours, I would even take this yarn for a spin in an amigurumi design.

    Comfy Worsted has great stitch definition and works up beautifully. At first, I thought this yarn had a bit more drag due to the cotton content but I switched up the hook I was using and there was no more drag so I think it was just that hook and yarn combo. These hooks by Clover just slid through the yarn like butter and drag was no longer an issue. Below you’ll see that I have a swatch with basic stitches done in the Copper Yarn. I have started with single crochet stitches, moved to half doubles and finished off with double crochet stitches. Following that, I’ve completed a swatch in paired double crochet to show it in a lacier stitch.

    Flat lay with We Crochet Comfy Worsted yarn in a swatch and three succulent plants
    Clover Amore Hooks with a crochet swatch done in We Crochet Comfy Worsted Yarn
    Close up image of the crochet swatch

    Splitting was minimal and I have to say, right now, this is my absolute favourite cotton yarn. I loved it so much, I decided to use it for my first garment pattern (coming soon!). To say that I’ve taken this yarn for a test stitch is an understatement as I’ve pretty much completed a 2XL garment sample in it before writing this review. The yarn is wonderfully soft against the skin and I loved working with it. My only complaint about this yarn is that it only comes in 50g balls. That is in no way a deal breaker. I just wish I could get this yarn in larger amounts. Put this yarn in a cone or a large cake and I would be all over it. If you’re looking for a great worsted weight cotton yarn for spring projects I don’t hesitate to recommend giving We Crochet’s Comfy Worsted Weight yarn a try.

    Thanks for checking out my yarn review. Have you tried Comfy Worsted yet? What did you think? What would you make with it? Let me know what you thought in the comments below!

    Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest to see all my newest content, behind the scenes sneak peeks and be the first to know when I’m hosting giveaways.

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheLoopyLamb
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    While you’re here, you may like checking out some of my other reviews: