• How To's

    How to Single Crochet (SC)

    Learn how to do the single crochet stitch (SC) with the help of this simple and clear, step-by-step crochet stitch tutorial. Perfect for beginners wanting to learn how to crochet.

#howtocrochet #singlecrochet #howto #learntocrochet #stitchtutorial #stepbystep #phototutorial

    The single crochet stitch is a simple, basic and versatile stitch. This stitch is used extensively in amigurumi patterns as it creates a dense, closed fabric. This tutorial will show you how to do the single crochet stitch with simple, step-by-step photos and instructions.

    When the single crochet stitch is used in a pattern, it will be abbreviated as SC.

    Step 1: Make a slip knot and chain your desired number of stitches. Insert your hook into the second chain (CH) from the hook through the center of the V and under the back bar of the chain. (You will never work in the 1st chain from the hook unless it is specified in the pattern).

    Step One of the Single Crochet Stitch
    Step Two of the Single Crochet Stitch

    Step 2: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull the yarn through the stitch. You will now have two loops on your hook.

    Step Three of the Single Crochet Stitch

    Step 3: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull through both loops on your hook. You will have one loop remaining on your hook. One SC completed.

    Step 4: Insert your hook into the next chain (CH) through the center of the V and under the back bar of the chain. Yarn over (YO), pull through the stitch. You will now have two loops on your hook. Yarn over (YO) and pull through both loops on your hook. You will have one loop remaining on your hook. This is your second single crochet stitch (SC) completed.

    Repeat Step 4 in each remaining chain.

    Completed Row of Single Crochet Stitches
    Completed first row of single crochet stitches

    To add a second (or more) row(s):
    To add a second row of single crochet, chain 1 and turn your work counterclockwise. You’ll now be working across the tops of the stitches you just made.

    Starting the second row of crochet stitches

    Step 1: Insert your hook into the last stitch of the previous row under top 2 loops (often referred to as the first stitch because it is the first stitch of this row), yarn over (YO) and pull through the stitch.
    Note: The chain 1 does not count as a stitch unless the pattern tells you otherwise

    Stitch Tutorial for beginner crocheters

    Step 2: Yarn over (YO) and pull through both loops on your hook. One Single Crochet Stitch completed.

    Completed first stitch

    Step 3: Insert your hook into the next stitch, yarn over (YO) and pull through the stitch. Yarn over (YO) and pull through both loops on your hook. One Single Crochet Stitch completed.

    Step 3: Repeat Step 2 in each remaining single crochet stitch across.

    Second completed row of single crochet stitches

    To add more rows, you would repeat the instructions for adding your second row until your piece reaches the desired size.

    Single Crochet Stitch Swatch

    I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial! Please don’t forget to pin and share this post. Like stitch tutorials? Check out my Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Tutorial! Want a pattern that uses the Single Crochet Stitch? Check out my Carter the Carrot Amigurumi Pattern.

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  • How To's,  Uncategorized

    How to Crochet the Foundation Double Crochet Stitch

    How to crochet the foundation double crochet stitch (FDC) - A stitch tutorial by The Loopy Lamb.  

#crochet #crochetstitch #crochettutorial #foundationdoublecrochet #chainlessfoundation #crochethacks #doublecrochet #tutorial
    This post may contain affiliate links. This is an unsponsored post and all opinons are my own.

    This week I want to show you how to do a foundation double crochet (FDC). You may have heard some buzz about foundation stitches (aka chainless foundation stitches) lately and there is a good reason why – Foundation stitches create your base chain and your first row of stitches for your project at the same time. The foundation double crochet stitch is a real time saver and it isn’t as tedious as working into chains to create your first row.

    Foundation stitches have more stretch than working into chains and tend to look tidier because it is easier to maintain tension throughout your first row. My favourite part? No more counting chains! You just make as many stitches as you need. What’s not to love?

    Chain 3

    Step 1: Ch 3.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 2

    Step 2: Yarn over and insert your hook into the 3rd chain from hook.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 3

    Step 3: Yarn over and pull up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook. Next, you’ll yarn over and pull through 1 loop on your hook. This creates the “chain”.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 4

    Step 4: Yarn over and draw through 2 loops on your hook. You should have 2 loops left on your hook.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 5

    Step 5: Yarn over and pull through all the loops on your hook. This creates your first foundation double crochet stitch.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 6

    Step 6: For the next stitch (and subsequent stitches), yarn over and insert your hook under the 2 loops of the “chain” of the last stitch and pull up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook again.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 7

    Step 7: Yarn over and draw through 1 loop on your hook. This leaves 3 loops on your hook.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 8

    Step 8: Yarn over and draw through 2 loops on your hook. This leaves 2 loops on your hook.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 9

    Step 9: Yarn over and draw through all the remaining loops on your hook. This creates your foundation double crochet stitch.

    Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Step 10

    Repeat steps 6 to 9 until you have the number of stitches required for your project.

    Completed Foundation Double Crochet Stitch

    I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial! Please don’t forget to pin and share this post.

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  • How To's

    How to Crochet the Foundation Single Crochet Stitch

    How to crochet the foundation single crochet stitch (FSC) - A stitch tutorial by The Loopy Lamb.  

#crochet #crochetstitch #crochettutorial #foundationsinglecrochet #chainlessfoundation #crochethacks #singlecrochet #tutorial

    You may have heard some buzz about foundation stitches (aka chainless foundation stitches) lately and there is a good reason why – Foundation stitches create your base chain and your first row of stitches for your project at the same time. The Foundation Single Crochet Stitch is a real time saver and it isn’t as tedious as working into chains to create your first row. Foundation stitches create your chains and first row of stitches at the same time.

    Foundation stitches have more stretch than working into chains and tend to look tidier because it is easier to maintain tension throughout your first row. My favourite part? No more counting chains! You just make as many stitches as you need. What’s not to love?

    How to Crochet the Foundation Single Crochet Stitch (FSC)

    Foundation Single Crochet Step 1

    Step 1: Chain 2.

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 2

    Step 2: Insert your hook in the second chain from the hook and yarn over.

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 3

    Step 3: Pull up a loop. You should have two loops on your hook.

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 4

    Step 4: Yarn over and pull through one loop on your hook. This creates your “chain”.

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 5

    Step 5: Yarn over and pull through both loops on your hook. This creates your first foundation single crochet (FSC).

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 6

    Step 6: For the next stitch (and subsequent stitches), insert your hook under the “chain” of the last stitch. Yarn over and pull up a loop (2 loops on hook).

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 7

    Step 7: Yarn over and pull through 1 loop on your hook.

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 8

    Step 8: Yarn over and pull through both loops on your hook. This creates your foundation single crochet stitch.

    Foundation Single Crochet Stitch Step 8

    Repeat steps 6 to 8 until you have the desired number of stitches for your project.

    Completed Foundation Single Crochet Stitches

    I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial! Please don’t forget to pin and share this post.

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  • How To's

    How to Do The Foundation Half Double Crochet Stitch

    This week I want to show you how to do a foundation half double crochet (FHDC). I’m showing you this technique this week because you’ll need it for next week’s free crochet pattern. Once you see how much quicker it is, you’ll be hooked!

    You may have heard some buzz about foundation stitches (aka chainless foundation stitches) lately and there is a good reason why – Foundation stitches create your base chain and your first row of stitches for your project at the same time. This is a real time saver and it isn’t as tedious as working into chains to creat your first row. Foundation stitches have more stretch than working into chains and tend to look tidier because it is easier to maintain tension throughout your first row. My favourite part? No more counting chains! You just make as many stitches as you need. What’s not to love?

    How to Crochet the Foundation Half Double Crochet

    Foundation Half Double Crochet Step 1

    Step 1: Ch 2.

    Foundation Half Double Crochet Step 2

    Step 2: Yarn over and insert your hook into the 2nd chain from hook.

    Foundation Half Double Crochet Step 3

    Step 3: Yarn over and pull up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook. Next, you’ll yarn over and pull through 1 loop on your hook. This creates the “chain”.

    Foundation Half Double Crochet Step 4

    Step 4: Yarn over and draw through all loops on your hook. This creates your first foundation half double crochet stitch.

    Foundation Half Double Crochet Step 5
    Foundation Half Double Crochet Step 5

    Step 5: For the next stitch (and subsequent stitches), yarn over and insert your hook under the 2 loops of the “chain” of the last stitch and pull up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook again.

    Step 6

    Step 6: Yarn over and draw through 1 loop on your hook.

    Step 7

    Step 7: Yarn over and draw through all the loops on your hook. Now you have 2 foundation half double crochet stitches (FHDC).

    Completed foundation half double crochet stitches

    Repeat steps 5 to 7 until you have the number of stitches you need for your project.

    I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial! Please don’t forget to pin and share this post.

    Want to learn how to do the foundation single crochet stitch next? Click HERE.

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  • How To's

    How to Get Your Crojo Back Overcoming Creative Block as a Crocheter

    How to Get Your Crojo Back.  Overcoming Creative Block as a Crocheter.  #Crochet #Crojo #Creativeblock #CrochetInspiration #Inspiration

    We’ve all been there. You want to pick up your crochet hook and get started on your next project but you’re not sure what to make. You try a few things and nothing feels right. Then it hits you: maybe you’ve lost your “crojo” (crochet mojo). I’ve been there on a number of occassions and it can be frustrating. Here are some ideas for helping you overcome your creavtive block and get your crojo back.

    Just Make Something… Anything!

    This one works for me when I suspect that my creative block may actually be just indecision. I check out my Ravelry Queue and I eenie miny moe that shit. Then, I just make it. Full disclosure: sometimes I get my kids to pick it for me so I don’t cheat with this process! Then I just work on the project. Even if I feel like I hate it and I want to frog it, I just push through. The relaxation that comes from crocheting tends to kick in and I get into the project. Once I’m done I’m ready to tackle something new and get creative again.

    Go Through Your Stash

    When just making something doesn’t work, I shop my own stash. I am an incredibly tactile person so I touch different yarns and just go wherever my eye takes me. I have a few skeins of yarn that I keep around just as inspiration (don’t tell my husband this. I keep saying I’ll make something with them someday). These yarns are beautiful and inspire me in different ways. Sometimes all it takes is a good old fashioned yarn cuddle to get the juices flowing. (Check out my tips HERE for organizing your yarn stash.)

    Check Out a Stitch Dictionary

    After checking my yarn stash I tend to break out my stitch dictionaries to see if anything there sparks interest. It typically does. Sometimes I just grab a ball of yarn and a stitch dictionary and do some swatches. This kind of ties back to my first point. Just make something. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had inspiration strike while making swatches. Plus, these swatches could be seamed together later to make another project. Score! (THIS book is a good stitch dictionary to start with)

    Surf the Net!

    Pinterest is a wonderful thing and inspiration is plentiful. Do a search for crochet and literally a million results comes up. Explore the results. Discover new makers and projects. Be sure to pin anything great you find so you don’t lose it (and you support the maker at the same time!). You can follow me on Pinterest HERE to see the pins that I’m pinning.

    Youtube is great for inpiration too! Search for crochet stitches to learn a new technique, crochet patterns and tips. There are so many incredible makers creating videos on Youtube that you’re sure to find something great to inspire you.

    Try Instagram too! There are so many stunning projects shared by makers on Instagram everyday that it can make your head spin. Try searching using the hashtags crochet, yarnpunk, crochetersofinstagram, amigurumi to get you started. You can follow me on Instagram HERE.

    Take a Break

    I know, I know. This is a blasphemy to even suggest but let’s be real. Sometimes, you just need to take a break. Go for a walk, exercise, have coffee with friends, meditate, take a nap. Do whatever helps you relieve stress and recharges you. Personally, I love to put on some energetic music and go for a walk.

    I hope that this has given you some ideas on how to get your crojo back. What do you do to try to get your crojo back? Let me know in the comments below. I’d love to hear from you!


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  • How To's

    How to Organize Your Yarn Stash

    How to Organize Your Yarn Stash - Got a pile of yarn and don't know where to start taming your stash?  I share some tips to get started that will help you be more efficient and help you feel more creative.  #yarnstash #yarnorgnization #howto #organizeyarn #yarn #crochet


    This post may contain affiliate links.
    This is an unsponsored post. All opinions are my own.

    This week I wanted to talk about some tips to organize your yarn stash. I can appreciate crocheter’s that have it all together. You know the ones I’m talking about. The people sharing pictures on Instagram and Facebook of their yarn stash beautifully organized in a room that has never had a child in it. Everything is perfectly in it’s place. They have their hooks organized in beautiful containers and they’re sorted by size. If you’re one of those people, I bow down to you, yarn organization god/goddess. I will think of your yarn room jealously as I search for the crochet hook that I have forgotten in my mom bun…again.

    I’m guilty of having multiple works in progress which I leave on my side table so they are accessible when I fancy picking them up again. I always vow to do better but I follow my creativity and then forget I vowed to do better… yeah, I kinda suck. After my son recently told me “Mom, your yarn is everywhere” I realized it was time to get my sh** together and organize my yarn stash for good this time.

    Let’s put this out there now: there is no one right way to do this. This is all up to personal preference. So if you start organizing your yarn and then realize that it just isn’t working for you, try something different. Just do what works for you and your space.

    Assess Your Stash

    First things first, take a quick stock of what you have. You’re going to have to do this Marie Kondo style and just make a big old pile of all your yarn. Do you have more than you thought you had? *Eeek* Me too.

    Clean it Up

    Got a bunch of messy hanks/skeins/balls in your stash? Take the time to wind them up and make them look pretty again. It may seem tedious now when you have all this yarn laying about everywhere to put away but you’ll thank yourself later. This will help your yarn look it’s best when you put it away and could save space if you’ve got a bunch of messy skeins laying around.

    Tame Those Scraps

    Got a bunch of scraps laying around? Maybe you’re saving them for a fun scrappy blanket or you’re like me and you use them as stuffing for amigurumi. If you’re going to keep them, get em organized. Put them in a container or wind them up if you can. I keep mine in a fun container that has opaque sides so they aren’t visible and they’re all contained.

    Decide How You Want to Sort It

    This can be done a few different ways. Here are a few organization method ideas to get you started:

    • Fiber content
    • Yarn Size
    • Yarn Packaging (i.e. yarn cakes together, yarn skeins together, yarn balls together, etc.)
    • Colour
    • Skein Size
    • Brand/Label

    Make sure that you keep yarn of the same dye lot together so you aren’t ripping your newly organized stash apart trying to find them later. My current stash is organized by colour and then by yarn weight within the colours.

    Write It Down

    This is a great opportunity to make a quick inventory of what you have. I like to keep my stash inventoried in an Excel workbook but Ravelry also has a great feature where you can track your yarn stash. It also gives you pattern suggestions for your yarn stash. Thanks Ravelry!

    Let it Go

    I’m totally singing the popular Disney song in my head as I type this and I did so as I sorted my stash too. If you’re not going to use it and/or it doesn’t inspire you – let it go my friend. I know it’s hard but there’s no sense in keeping if if you won’t use it. Gift it to another crafter, sell it or donate it. Oh look! Room for more yarn!

    Wrangle Your WIPs

    If you have a load of WIPs that are needing to be frogged, do it now so it isn’t hanging over your head. Wind the yarn up and add it to the stash. If you’re not going to do that, maybe donate your project to another crocheter that may be interested in completing it or is at least willing to frog it for the yarn. If you have other WIPs that are still in the queue, assign a specific place for them. I like to keep mine in project bags so it looks a little neater.

    Regardless of how you organize your stash, make sure it works for you and inspires you. I like opening my yarn cabinet and knowing that something will likely jump out at me (not literally, I just organized it!) and inspire me.

    I hope you enjoyed this article on how to organize your yarn stash. Which tip helped you the most? Happy organizing!

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  • How To's

    How to Read a Yarn Label

    How to Read a Yarn Label - Make sure you're buying the right yarn for your next project!

#yarnlabel #crochet #beginnercrochet #howto #interpretyarnlabel #howtocrochet

    This post may contain affiliate links.
    This is an unsponsored post. All opinions are my own.

    When you’re a beginner, wanting to pick out yarn for that new project you’re wanting to tackle, it can be easy to get overwhelmed or confused by all the choices available. You pick up a pretty yarn and turn it over to look at the label and you have no idea what any of that means. What does that number on the yarn ball mean? What the heck are those little squares with the needles on them? It may not seem overly important at the time, especially if you’re just buying the yarn based on it’s squish-factor but that label has a lot of important info on it that you’ll need. Here I’ll walk you through how to read a yarn label so next time you go yarn shopping, you can easily determine what that label is trying to tell you and whether it’s the yarn you need.

    Here is a yarn label I have from a skein of Bernat Blanket yarn.

    How to Read a Yarn Label - Make sure you're buying the right yarn for your next project!

#yarnlabel #crochet #beginnercrochet #howto #interpretyarnlabel #howtocrochet
    1. Weight: Whenever you see this symbol, it indicates what the weight of the yarn is. Yarn weight standards are determined by the Craft Yarn Council. You can check out their standards system HERE. This particular yarn is a super bulky weight yarn.
    2. Knitting Gauge: This symbols shows the knitting gauge of the yarn. You should be able to get a 10cm x 10 cm or 4 in by 4 in square by knitting 8 stitches by 14 rows using 8mm needles.
    3. Crochet Gauge: This symbol shows crochet gauge of the yarn. You should be able to get a 10cm x 10 cm or 4 in by 4 in square by crocheting 6 single crochets stitches for 8 rows. The gauge information is helpful if you are considering substituting a yarn for your project. If the gauge on the yarn you want to use matches the gauge of the yarn the project calls for, generally, you should be able to use that yarn for your project.
    4. Washing Information: If you’re spending that time to create something, you’ll want to take care of it. The label includes information about how to care for your finished item made from the yarn. Symbol a) means that items are machine washable in cold water. Symbol b) means do not use bleach. Symbol c) means you can tumble dry this item on low heat (bonus!) Symbol d) means do not iron. Symbol e) means do not dry clean. You can get the list of what all the washing instruction symbols mean here at the Craft Yarn Council Website.
    5. Material(s): This tells you what the yarn is comprised of. In this case, 100% polyester. Some yarns are made of a blend of multiple fibers and how much of each fibre is used to make up the content will be listed here. I.e. 20% merino wool, 60% acrylic, 20% nylon.
    6. Net Weight, Yards/Meters: Here you’ll find how much yarn is in the skein. This information is vital. If your project needs 800 yards of Bernat Blanket yarn, you are going to need to make sure you buy enough yarn for your project. This skein has 220 yards of yarn in it so I would need to by 4 skeins in order to have enough for my project.

    I hope this helps you decipher your yarn labels! Happy yarn shopping!

    Need to learn how to organize your yarn stash? Check out my tips HERE.

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  • How To's

    Setting Crochet Goals

    This post may contain affiliate links.
    This is an unsponsored post and the thoughts/opinions are all my own.

    It’s getting close to the end of the year and many of us are thinking about resolutions for the new year.  Around this time of year, I like to take a review the goals I had made for the year, celebrate my triumphs and review any goals I hadn’t met, looking for growth opportunities.  While thinking about this the other day I started to consider what new goals I wanted to set for myself next year, both personal and professional.

    Many of us crochet as a hobby and/or a way to relax and destress but that doesn’t mean that you can’t set some goals as a way to challenge yourself, expand your skills and have some fun.  It’s important to make these goals fun and not to beat yourself up if you don’t meet them or struggle with them.   Look at goals you aren’t able to meet as opportunities for learning and growth, rather than failure to use them as positive stepping stones to moving forward with your goals.

    To begin goal setting, you’ll need to initially think about what kind of goal you want to set.  Do you want to increase your skills by learning new stitches?  Tackle a project that you have been intimidated by in the past? Maybe you want to make a certain number of hats/scarves/blankets etc. for next year’s market season?  Whatever your goal is, make sure that it is important and meaningful for you.  If you think that you want to crochet 50 of the same beanies by next fall but you know deep down that you dislike doing the same pattern over and over again, maybe you should rethink your goals.

    If you’re stuck and need some ideas to get the ball rolling, here are some crochet goals you could consider:

    • Finish all WIPs (work’s in progress)
    • Learn a new crochet technique/stitch
    • Tackle a pattern that you’ve been wanting to try but were too intimidated to start/didn’t have time for
    • Sell one of your crochet projects/start an Etsy shop (if you sign-up through this link, we both get 40 free listings!)
    • Complete a Crochet Along (CAL)
    • Finish “insert number” of projects every month
    • Crochet more for charity
    • Save up for a certain crochet accessory or yarn
    • Use up more yarn in my stash and buy less new yarn unless I need it

    How to Get Started:

    When you have got your ideas ready, now you need to write it down.  It’s so easy to forget the goals you set in December/January when April rolls around.  If you’re like me, you’ve forgotten exactly what you planned 10 minutes after you thought it unless you wrote it down.  So write it down and commit to your goals.  While you’re writing it down, quantify your goals to make them measurable.  When a goal is measurable, it’s easier for you to assess whether you’re meeting your goals.  i.e. I want to crochet 30 hats for charity or I want to complete 3 WIPs each month.

    Break Each Goal Down Into Steps:

    Set the steps that you will take to achieve your goals.  It’s up to you how detailed you want to get in this step.  If I use the example goal of crocheting 30 hats for charity I would break that down into the following steps:

    • Decide which charity to crochet for
    • Research requirements (if any) for donations
    • Purchase necessary materials
    • Complete 1 hat per (insert time frame)
    • Donate hats by (insert deadline)

    Once you have those set out, it’s important to review your goals regularly.  You may decide 3 months down the line that you want to change or refine your goals even further.  You can do that! Nothing is set in stone.  Reviewing your goals will help keep you on track and remind you of what you were wanting to achieve.

    Post Your Goals Somewhere Obvious

    Putting your goals in a place where you will regularly see them can help keep them fresh in your mind. Going through all this trouble just to put the goals in a drawer somewhere to be forgotten isn’t doing yourself any favours. I like to put mine on the fridge or in my crochet hook case.

    Celebrate Your Accomplishments

    Celebrate every little win, no matter how small.  Setting yourself a little reward system for meeting your goals can help keep you motivated and more likely to stay on track if your rewards are something you really want.   Some example rewards could be:

    • Buy new yarn/crochet hook
    • Start a new project (if your goal is to finish more WIPs)
    • Buy a new pattern

    What are your crochet goals for next year?  Let me know in the comments below and share your achievements with me!  I want to celebrate your wins with you!

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