• How To's

    How to Crochet the Floret Stitch Step-By-Step Tutorial

    two textured crochet stitch swatches in a flay lay with text reading How to crochet Floret stitch with video instructions
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    The Floret Stitch is a quick and easy crochet stitch to do that creates a beautifully textured fabric. It’s a simple two row repeat so it’s great for crocheting while you watch TV. The Floret Stitch is easy enough for beginners to learn so let’s grab our hooks and our yarn and let’s learn how to crochet the Floret Stitch!

    Pin it for later Save

    You can use any hook and yarn combination with this stitch but today I’ll be using a Furls Odyssey 5.5mm crochet hook and a Brava Worsted Weight Yarn from We Crochet. You can mix up your hook and yarn weights to change up the look of this stitch. I love how the Floret Stitch looks in a Super Bulky weight yarn. I used the Floret Stitch in my Heather Super Scarf Pattern using Lion Brand Thick and Quick yarn and my model loved the scarf so much, she took it home with her. Find the free crochet scarf pattern for the Heather Super Scarf HERE give it a try to practice this stitch.

    Check out my How to Crochet the Floret Stitch video tutorial here:

    Abbreviations:

    Stitch Multiple:

    • Chain in multiples of 2 + 3

    Notes:

    • CH 3s at the beginning of row count as a DC ST
    • CH 1s at the beginning of row count as a SL ST
    • Placing a stitch marker in the first SL ST of your row will help you from missing this ST in subsequent rounds.

    How to Crochet the Floret Stitch

    Row 1: CH your desired number of chains. For my example here, I have created a chain of 23. DC in the 4th CH from the hook and in each CH across. Turn.

    Starting chain in multiples of 2+3
    Double crochet worked in the 4th chain from the hook
    Completed first row of the how to crochet floret stitch tutorial

    Row 2: CH 1 (counts as first SL ST here and throughout), *DC in the next ST, SL ST in the next*. Repeat instructions in the ** until the end of the row, working the last SL ST into the top of the CH 3. You may find it helpful to place a stitch marker in the slip stitch at the beginning of this row to help you find it when working your Row 3.

    slip stitch and double crochet stitches completed for Row 2
    Completed row two of the how to crochet floret stitch tutorial showing the start of texture

    Row 3: CH 3 (counts as first DC here and throughout), DC in the 2nd ST and each ST across.

    Completed row 3 of the floret stitch

    Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until your project is your desired size!

    completed swatch, showing the beautiful texture of the stitch being taught.

    That’s it! Isn’t that’s so simple? What kind of project would you use the Floret Stitch for?

    Want to learn something else? Check out these other great free crochet tutorials:

  • How To's

    How to Crochet the Paired Double Crochet Stitch

    Collage of the steps of this how to crochet the paired double crochet stitch tutorial
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    The Paired Double Crochet Stitch, is super simple to learn and is a fun variation on the double crochet stitch that is created using the double crochet decrease (DC2TOG) and chain stitches. This is a simple one row repeat that works up quickly and creates a fabric with. a bit of a lacier look to it without all the hassel. I’ve got both a photo and video tutorial for us today so let’s grab our hooks and our yarn and let’s learn how to crochet the Paired Double Crochet Stitch.

    Pin it for later Save

    You can use any hook and yarn combination with this stitch but today I’ll be using a Furls Odyssey 5.5mm crochet hook and a Brava Worsted Weight Yarn from We Crochet. You can mix up your hook and yarn weights to change up the look of this stitch. Using a larger hook with a worsted weight yarn will create a more open look and would be great for bags and summer accessories.

    Check out my How to Crochet the Paired Double Crochet Stitch video tutorial here:

    Abbreviations:

    • CH = Chain
    • CH SP(s) = Chain Space(s)
    • DC = Double Crochet
    • DC2TOG = Double Crochet Two Together
    • ST(s) = Stitch(es)

    Stitch Multiple:

    • Chain any even number of CHs

    Notes:

    • CH 3s at the beginning of row count as a DC ST
    • If you don’t know how to do the DC2TOG/DCDEC stitch, learn how to do that with my Double Crochet Decrease Stitch Tutorial HERE.

    How to Crochet the Paired Double Crochet Stitch

    Row 1: CH your desired number of chains. For my example here, I have created a chain of 20. DC2TOG over the 4th and 5th CHs from the hook (skipped 3 CHs count as first DC). *CH 1, DC2TOG over the next 2 CHs* repeat instructions in ** until 1 chain remains. CH 1, DC in the last CH. Turn.

    Close up image of this first DC2TOG being done
    Setp 2 of the paired double crochet stitch
    completed first row of the paired double crochet stitch tutorial

    Row 2: CH 3, DC2TOG over the 1st and 2nd CH SPs, CH 1, *DC2TOG starting in the same CH SP as the last ST and finishing in the next unworked CH SP. CH 1* repeat instructions in the ** across your row. Work the last leg of your last DC2TOG between the CH 3 and the first leg of your DC2TOG from the previous row. DC in the top of the CH 3. Turn.

    starting row two of the stitch tutorial
    second DC2TOG cluster completed
    Finger pointing to the CH3 of row 1 reminding readers to work into the chain

    Repeat Row 2 until your pattern reaches your desired length.

    completed paired double crochet stitch tutorial swatch with a yellow crochet hook

    Want to learn something else? Check out these other great free crochet tutorials:

  • How To's

    Half Double Crochet Decrease Tutorial

    collage of images illustration how to do the Half double crochet decrease
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Today I want to share my tutorial for how to do a Half Double Crochet Decrease, which is also known as the HDCDEC, DC2TOG or Half Double Crochet Two Together Stitch. This stitch is a variation of the Half Double Crochet Stitch and is regularly used as a way to reduce two Half Double Crochet stitches to a single Half Double Crochet Stitch. I’ve got both a photo and video tutorial for us today so let’s grab our hooks and our yarn and let’s learn how to crochet the Half Double Crochet Decrease Stitch or HDCDEC.

    Pin it for later Save

    You can use any hook and yarn combination with this stitch but today I’ll be using a Furls Odyssey 5.5mm crochet hook and a Brava Worsted Weight Yarn from We Crochet.

    Check out my How to do the Half Double Crochet Decrease Stitch video tutorial here:

    Abbreviations:

    • CH = Chain
    • HDC = Half Double Crochet
    • HDCDEC = Half Double Crochet Decrease*
    • HDC2TOG = Half Double Crochet Two Together*
    • ST(s) = Stitch(es)
    • YO = Yarn Over

    **You may see HDCDEC or HDC2TOG used to describe this same stitch in different patterns. I tend to stick to HDCDEC in my own designs but know that if you see HDC2TOG in other patterns, they tend to mean the same thing.

    How to Crochet the Half Double Crochet Decrease Stitch

    Step 1: Yarn over (YO) hook and insert hook into the first stitch (ST) from the row below. YO and pull up a loop. You should have three (3) loops on your hook.

    Step one of the HDC2TOG
    three loops on the crochet hook of a crochet stitch in progress

    Step 2: YO hook and insert hook into the next ST. YO and pull up a loop. You should have five (5) loops on your hook.

    Next step of how to do the half double crochet decrease stitch

    Step 3: YO hook and pull through all five (5) loops on your hook. HDCDEC/HDC2TOG completed.

    completed half double crochet decrease
    3 completed half double crochet decrease stitches in a swatch

    That’s it! Isn’t that’s so simple? Here are some free crochet patterns on my blog that use the Half Double Crochet Decrease Stitch so you can practice your new skill:

    Want to learn something else? Check out these other great free crochet tutorials:

  • How To's

    How to do a Double Crochet Decrease or DC2TOG

    Completed double crochet decrease stitch
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Today I want to share my tutorial for how to do a Double Crochet Decrease, which is also known as the DCDEC, DC2TOG or Double Crochet Two Together Stitch. This stitch is a variation of the Double Crochet Stitch and is regularly used as a way to reduce two Double Crochet stitches to a single Double Crochet Stitch but it can also be paired with other stitches to create an upside down “V”-shaped stitch in a fabric. I’ve got both a photo and video tutorial for us today so let’s grab our hooks and our yarn and let’s learn how to crochet the Double Crochet Decrease Stitch.

    Pin it for later Save

    You can use any hook and yarn combination with this stitch but today I’ll be using a Furls Odyssey 5.5mm crochet hook and a Brava Worsted Weight Yarn from We Crochet. You can mix up your hook and yarn weights to change up the look of this stitch. Using a larger hook with a worsted weight yarn will create a more open look and would be great for bags and summer accessories.

    Check out my How to Crochet the Double Crochet Decrease Stitch video tutorial here:

    Abbreviations:

    • CH = Chain
    • DC = Double Crochet
    • DCDEC = Double Crochet Decrease*
    • DC2TOG = Double Crochet Two Together*
    • ST(s) = Stitch(es)
    • YO = Yarn Over

    **You may see DCDEC or DC2TOG used to describe this same stitch in different patterns. I tend to stick to DCDEC in my own designs but know that if you see DC2TOG in other patterns, they tend to mean the same thing.

    How to Crochet the Double Crochet Decrease Stitch

    Step 1: Yarn over (YO) hook and insert hook into the first stitch (ST) from the row below. YO and pull up a loop. You should have three loops on your hook. YO and pull through two loops on your hook.

    step one of the double crochet decrease
    step two of the DCDEC stitch

    Step 2: YO hook and insert hook into the next ST. YO and pull up a loop. You should have four loops on your hook.

    YO hook and pull through two loops on your hook. You should have 3 loops on your hook.

    step 3 of the DCDEC stitch
    last step of the double crochet decrease tutorial

    Step 3: YO hook and pull through all 3 loops on your hook. DCDEC/DC2TOG completed.

    first completed DCDEC stitch
    completed double crochet decrease stitches

    That’s it! Isn’t that’s so simple? Here are some free crochet patterns on my blog that use the Double Crochet Decrease Stitch so you can practice your new skill:

    Want to learn something else? Check out these other great free crochet tutorials:

  • How To's

    How to Do The Russian Join Step-by-Step Tutorial

    a close up image of a russian join completed with this tutorial
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    Getting near the end of your yarn and all you can think about is how you’re going to have to weave in yet ANOTHER end? Friend, I’m right there with you. Sometimes, particularly when I’m working on a larger project, I will do whatever it takes to avoid having any unnecessary ends to weave in. Enter: the Russian Join. Today I’m going to teach you how to do the Russian Join to help you join your ends together so you have less ends to weave in to your project.

    Don’t Forget to Pin this Russian Join Tutorial for Later Save


    The Russian Join is a great way to join yarns together and avoid extra ends to weave in. It can be used for adding a new skein or changing colours. This can be done for both knitting and crocheting and works best with two yarns of the same weight. Sounds great, right? Here’s how to do it:

    To do the Russian Join, you’ll need:

    • two different yarns (the new yarn you want to attach to your project and the working yarn attached to your project)
    • a tapestry or darning needle

    Watch my video tutorial on how to do the Russian Join here:

    1. Thread a tapestry needle with the new yarn that you want to attach and leave a tail a few inches long.
    tapestry threaded onto a strand of yarn, next to a pair of scissors

    2. Turn the needle back towards the strand of yarn and insert it into the plies. Thread the needle through the plies for about 2 – 3 inches (adjust this to be longer for slippery yarns). Keep the yarn tail inside the plies of the yarn. Make sure you keep a small loop near the top – the smaller the better. I like to put a stitch marker here to help make sure I don’t accidentally lose my loop.

    Step 1 of how to do the russian join
    tapestry needle being fed through a strand of yarn.

    3. Pull the needle all the way through and remove the needle from the thread. It will look bunched up but when you smoothe it out, it will cover the rest of/most of the tail. If your loop is too big, tug on the tail to tighten it up. Trim any excess.

    hands manipulating yarn into the russian join
    yarn bunched up on itself, holding a stitch marker

    scissors cutting the end of yarn from the first half of the russian join.

    4. Take your working yarn (ensuring you have a generous tail) and thread it onto the needle, leaving a tail of a few inches. Insert the needle through the small loop at the top of the new yarn that you worked through and insert it back into itself. You can remove your stitch marker now (if you used one).

    tapestry needle being fed through the yarn

    final step of the tutorial, hands holding yarn

    5. Pull the needle all the way through and remove the needle from the thread. It will look bunched up but when you smoothe it out, it will cover the rest of the tail. If your loop is too big, tug on the tail to tighten it up. Trim any excess.

    completed russian join

    And there you have it. A completed Russian Join.

    A word of caution: Although I’ve used this technique successfully many times with a variety of yarns I will say that it doesn’t work with all yarn types. There are some yarns that may look noticably thicker so you’ll have to use your discretion on whether this technique will work for your project.
    For the majority of the yarns I have used this with in the past, it hasn’t been very noticeable and allows me to keep working on my project after only a momentary pause to work the join. I would not recommend using this technique with roving yarns or yarns have have really fine strands to make up a thicker ply like, Caron X Pantone Yarns or as the results I had were messy and too noticeable in my work.

    I hope you enjoyed learning how to do the Russian Join. If you have any questions or comments, I’d love to hear from you. Do you have another favourite way to join your yarn or a way you’d like me to demonstrate here? Let me know your thoughts below.

    While you’re here, check out these tutorials and learn something new:

  • How To's

    How to Crochet the Thicket Stitch

    Crochet Thicket stitch Swatch with a text overlay indicating a tutorial for beginner crocheters
    This post may contain affiliate links.

    Today I want to show you one of my absolute favourite crochet stitches: the Thicket Stitch. Now, the Thicket Stitch often gets passed over because it is considered a beginner’s crochet stitch because it’s a simple one row repeat. But I love this stitch for it’s wonderful texture, versatility and it’s simplicity. This stitch can be a bit of a chameleon and it’s part of what I love about it. When I say chameleon, I mean that you can use the same stitch and with a slight variation, have it look completely different. Every time I use this stitch in a design, even though I’ve done so multiple times, I always get asked “what stitch is that?!” I think you’ll love having this simple but versatile crochet stitch in your tool box. So grab your hooks, grab your yarn and let’s learn how to crochet the Thicket Stitch.

    Pin it for later Save

    You can use any hook and yarn combination with this stitch but today I’ll be using a Furls Odyssey 5.5mm crochet hook and a Brava Worsted Weight Yarn from We Crochet. You can mix up your hook and yarn weights to change up the look of this stitch and have it look a bit lacier if you wish. Thicket stitch is wonderful for fast and easy crochet blankets! In fact, my first crochet blanket design I published uses this stitch. Find the Striped Thicket Stitch Blanket Pattern HERE and give it a try to practice this stitch.

    To do this tutorial, you’ll need to know how to do the Single Crochet (SC) and Double Crochet (DC) stitches. You can find the tutorials for them here: Single Crochet, Double Crochet.

    Check out my How to Do the Crochet Thicket Stitch video tutorial here:

    Starting Chain: Chain any even number of stitches. For my example here, I’ve done a chain of 20.

    CH 20

    Row 1: SC in the second CH from the hook. DC in the same CH. *Skip 1 CH and place 1 SC and 1 DC stitch in the next CH* Repeat the instructions in the ** until 2 CHs remain. Skip 1 CH, SC in the last CH. CH 1 and turn your work.

    starting the first thicket stitch cluster
    Single Crochet Step 1
    single crochet tutorial image
    Single Crochet Step 2
    completed single crochet stitch in grey yarn
    Single Crochet Step 3
    beginning of double crochet stitch
    Double Crochet Step 1

    Double Crochet tutorial
    Double Crochet Step 2
    completed double crochet stitch
    Double Crochet Step 3
    completed crochet stitch demo
    Continuing with (SC, DC) in every other CH across.

    Row 2: (SC, DC) in the first ST, *skip the next ST, (SC, DC) in the next ST* repeat instructions in the ** until 1 ST remains. SC in the last ST.

    crochet tutorial for beginners
    Row 2 Single Crochet Step 3
    Double Crochet stitch demo
    Row 2 – Double Crochet Step 3
    Crochet Stitch Tutorial
    First Cluster of Row Two Completed
    Completed rows of Thicket Stitch
    Completed rows of Thicket Stitch

    Repeat Row 2 until you’ve reached your desired length.

    Completed Thicket Stitch Swatch
    Completed Thicket Stitch Swatch

    That’s it! It’s super easy right? This stitch looks amazing as dishclothes, blankets, garments, pillows and more! Changing colours every few rows gives this stitch a totally different look and I just love the versatility! Here are some free crochet patterns you can use to practice the this stitch:

  • How To's

    Picot Single Crochet & Granule Stitch Tutorial

    Picot Single Crochet Tutorial images
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    If you can do. the single crochet stitch and do a chain, then you can. do the Picot Single Crochet Stitch! Picot Single Crochet Stitch is a variation of the single crochet stitch that creates a beautifully textured fabric that looks like tiny bobbles.

    The Picot Single Crochet Stitch is abbeviated in patterns as (PSC). The different between the basic single crochet and the Picot Single Crochet stitch is quick and easy to accomplish. The PSC needs to be worked from the wrong side of the fabric so that the picots will pop out on the right side of the fabric. You’ll often see the PSC worked with a row of single crochet (or other row of stitches) in between them. When rows of the Picot Single Crochet Stitch are alternated with rows of single crochet stitches, it is referred to as the Granule Stitch.

    Pin this Stitch Tutorial for later SAVE

    The Picot Single Crochet can be used in a variety of different ways but for today’s tutorial, I’ll show you how to do the Picot Single Crochet stitch as it is worked in the Granule Stitch. If you need to learn how to do the Single Crochet Stitch, you can find that tutorial HERE.

    Watch my video tutorial for the Granule & PSC Stitch here:

    Picot Single Crochet & Granule Stitch Multiples

    If you want linear picots (ones that line up, straight up and down), you’ll need to create a starting chain with a multiple of 2 +1+1. To stagger your picots as typically done with Granule stitch, you’ll need to start with a multiple of 4+1+1 for the turning chain.

    Picot Single Crochet:

    Step 1: Insert hook into indicated stitch, yarn over hook and pull through stitch. 

    Step 2: Yarn over and pull through one loop on the hook three times. 

    Step 3: Yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook.

    Granule Stitch with Staggered Picots

    Row 1: Chain a multiple of 4+1+1 for the turning chain. I used 18 for my starting chain. SC in the 2nd CH from the hook and remaining CH. Ch 1 and turn.

    Base row and stitch multiple of Picot Single Crochet Stitch

    Row 2: SC in the first ST, *PSC in the next ST, SC in the next ST* repeat instructions contained in the ** until end of row. CH 1 and turn.

    Granule Stitch Step 1
    Picot Single Crochet Step 2
    Step 3

    Row 3: SC in the first ST and each ST across. CH 1 and turn.

    Row 4: SC in the first and 2nd STS * PSC, SC* until one ST remains. SC in the last ST. CH 1 and turn.

    Row 5: SC in the first ST and each ST across

    Repeat Rows 4 and 5 until you reach your desired length.


    Granule Stitch with Linear Picots

    Row 1: Chain a multiple of 2+1, +1 for the turning chain. My starting chain is 18. SC in the 2nd CH from the hook and remaining CH. Ch 1 and turn.

    Base row and stitch multiple of Granule stitch

    Row 2: SC in the first ST, *PSC in the next ST, SC in the next ST* repeat instructions contained in the ** until end of row. CH 1 and turn.

    Picot Single Crochet Tutorial
    Granule Stitch Step 2
    Picot Single Crochet Step 3

    Row 3: SC in the first ST and each ST across. CH 1 and turn.

    Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until you reach your desired length.

    Granule Stitch Swatch with Linear Picots on the bottom and offset Picots on the top.

    That’s it! The PSC and Granule Stitches are fun and easy. You can practice using the Picot Single Crochet Stitch in my Picot Me Up Ear Warmer and Cowl Set Pattern.

    I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!  Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest so you can be kept in the loop on all the latest updates and sneak peaks.

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheLoopyLamb
    Instagram:
      www.instagram.com/TheLoopyLamb
    YouTube: Subscribe to my YouTube Channel
    Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/theloopylamb
    Newsletter: Sign up for my newsletter!

  • How To's

    How to Crochet a Magic Circle Tutorial

    Step by step images showing how to crochet a magic circle with a column of text to the left
    This post may contain affiliate links

    This step-by-step tutorial will help you learn how to crochet a magic circle – often referred to as a magic ring or adjustable circle/ring. The magic circle/magic ring is a really handy technique to know if you’re a fan of amigurumi projects. The magic circle is an alternative to creating a ring with a chain 4 which would typically leave an open hole in your project. When you use a magic circle to being your project it creates a tightly closed ring when you’re crocheting in the round. So if you’re using it for amigurumi, this means no hole for the stuffing to show through and a more professional-looking finish.

    Pin this tutorial so you can refer back to it later. Save

    This technique is relatively easy to do but with some practice, it’ll be as easy as creating a starting chain.

    For this tutorial, I’m using a 5.5 mm Furls Odyssey Crochet Hook and Bernat Premium (size 4) yarn in Sky Blue.

    Check out the video version of this tutorial here:

    How to Crochet the Magic Circle

    Using your non-dominant hand, hold the end of the yarn between your thumb and pointer finger. Wrap the working yarn around your fingers (from front to back) once.

    Hands holding a piece of blue yarn
    Yarn being wrapped around fingers

    Cross the working yarn over top of the yarn on the inside of your hand and lay the working yarn across the top of your fingers. I like to use my pinky finger to hold it down and keep it secure fo the next part.

    Yarn being crossed over itself while a person demonstrates how to crochet a magic circle
    Yarn wrapped around a hand twice showing how to crochet a magic circle

    Insert your crochet hook underneath the first strand of yarn and grab the second strand of yarn.

    Crochet hook grabbing second strand of yarn wrapped around person's fingers

    Pull the second strand of yarn under the first strand of yarn.

    second strand of yarn being pulled under first strand of yarn by crochet hook

    Twist the yarn to create a loop. Yarn over the hook using the working yarn and pull through the loop to create a chain.

    Yarn twisted to create a loop to crochet a magic circle
    Yarn over crochet hook to create a chain
    Chain completed for how to make a magic circle

    Remove your fingers from the loop. Your magic circle is now completed!

    completed magic circle


    Working Your First Row

    To work into the magic circle, work your desired stitches into the magic cirlce, ensuring that both the ring and yarn tail are crocheted over. In my example here, I’m crocheting six single crochet stitches (Get my tutorial on how to do the single crochet stitch HERE).

    working into a magic circle

    When you’ve finished crocheting your first round of stitches, gently pull the yarn tail until your ring closes and you have a tightly closed ring. like in the image below.

    Continue working your second round of stitches as normal.

    Now that you know how to crochet a magic circle, let’s pratice using it! Some of my free crochet patterns that utilize the magic circle technique are:
    Clawdia Cat, Carter the Carrot, Penny the Bunny Cactus, Buttons the Bunny CAL (part one, part two and part three) and Once in a Blue Moon Triangle Scarf.

    Follow The Loopy Lamb on Facebook and Instagram! Sign up for my Newsletter to be kept in the loop and never miss a thing.

  • How To's

    How to do the Double Crochet Stitch

    How to double crochet tutorial images with a text overlay.
    This post may contain affiliate links.

    The double crochet stitch is a simple, versatile stitch that is one of the most commonly used stitches in crochet. In terms of height, this stitch is taller than both a single crochet and half double crochet stitch but shorter than the treble (triple) crochet stitch. This tutorial will show you how to double crochet with simple, step-by-step photos and instructions.

    For this tutorial, I’m using a 5.5 mm Furls Odyssey Crochet Hook and Bernat Premium (size 4) yarn in Sky Blue.

    When the double crochet stitch is used in a pattern (using U.S. terms), it will be abbreviated as DC.

    Check out the video for this tutorial:



    Step 1: Make a slip knot and chain your desired number of stitches minus 1 CH. I.e. If you want 20 stitches, CH 19. Now chain 3 more stitches. For practice, start by creating 14 chains. Yarn over (YO) and insert your hook into the fourth chain (CH) from the hook through the center of the V and under the back bar of the chain. (You will never work in the 1st chain from the hook unless it is specified in the pattern).

    Crochet Chains made with blue yarn
    Second step of how to double crochet

    Step 2: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull the yarn through the chain. You will now have three loops on your hook.

    Step 3 of the crochet stitch tutorial using blue yarn
    Step 4 of the crochet stitch tutorial using blue yarn

    Step 3: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull through two loops on your hook. You will have two loops remaining on your hook.

    Two loops on a crochet stitch in progress using blue yarn

    Step 4: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull thtrough remaining two loops on your hook. You will have one loop remaining on your hook. One double crochet stitch completed.

    One completed stitch and a CH 3 turning chain

    Step 5: Yarn over and insert your hook into the next chain (CH) through the center of the V and under the back bar of the chain. Yarn over (YO), pull through the chain. You will now have three loops on your hook. Yarn over (YO) and pull through two loops on your hook. You will have two loops remaining on your hook. Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull thtrough remaining two loops on your hook. You will have one loop remaining on your hook This is your second double crochet stitch (DC) completed.

    Repeat Step 5 in each remaining chain.

    starting of a second double crochet stitch
    second step of how to double crochet
    second stitch completed.

    Note: When counting your stitches, make sure you count the first three skipped stitches as a stitch. If you are following the example and started with a CH 14, you should have 12 stitches.

    To add a second (or more) row(s):


    To add a second row of DC stitches, chain 3 and turn your work counterclockwise. You’ll now be working across the tops of the stitches you just made.

    Note: The chain 3 typically counts as a stitch unless the pattern tells you otherwise. This chain is referred to as the turning chain.

    Chain 3 of the second row of crochet swatch

    Step 1: Yarn over and insert your hook into the second to last stitch of the previous row under top 2 loops , yarn over (YO) and pull through the stitch. Yarn over (YO) and pull through two loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through remaining two loops on hook. One DC Stitch completed.

    Close up of the beginning of the first stitch of the second row of double crochet
    In progress stitch

    Step 2: Yarn over and insert your hook into the next stitch of the previous row under top 2 loops , yarn over (YO) and pull through the stitch. Yarn over (YO) and pull through two loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through remaining two loops on hook. One DC Stitch completed.

    Step 3: Repeat Step 2 in each remaining DC stitch across.

    Second row of stitches completed.

    To add more rows, you would repeat the instructions for adding your second row until your piece reaches the desired size.

    swatch of completed stitches

    I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial! Please don’t forget to pin and share this post. Like stitch tutorials? Check out my Single Crochet Stitch Tutorial, Half Double Crochet Stitch Tutorial, Foundation Half Double Crochet Stitch Tutorial and Foundation Double Crochet Stitch Tutorial.

    Follow The Loopy Lamb on Facebook and Instagram! Sign up for my Newsletter to be kept in the loop and never miss a thing.

  • How To's

    How to Half Double Crochet (HDC)

    Step by step photos showing how to do the half double crochet stitch.
    This post may contain affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

    The half double crochet stitch is a simple, basic and versatile stitch. In terms of height, this stitch is half way between a single crochet and a double crochet stitch. This tutorial will show you how to do the half double crochet stitch with simple, step-by-step photos and instructions. A video tutorial is also included.

    When the half double crochet stitch is used in a pattern, it will be abbreviated as HDC.

    Don’t lose it! Pin it for later Save

    Watch the Video Version of This Half Double Crochet Stitch Tutorial Here:

    Step 1: Make a slip knot and chain your desired number of stitches. Yarn over (YO) and insert your hook into the third chain (CH) from the hook through the center of the V and under the back bar of the chain. (You will never work in the 1st chain from the hook).

    how to crochet a chain
    first step of how to crochet half double crochet stitch

    Step 2: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull the yarn through the chain. You will now have three loops on your hook.

    second step of how to hdc

    Step 3: Yarn over (YO) your hook and pull through all three loops on your hook. You will have one loop remaining on your hook. One half double crochet stitch (HDC) completed.

    how to half double crochet stitch

    Step 4: Yarn over and insert your hook into the next chain (CH) through the center of the V and under the back bar of the chain. Yarn over (YO), pull through the chain. You will now have three loops on your hook. Yarn over (YO) and pull through all three loops on your hook. You will have one loop remaining on your hook. This is your second half double crochet (HDC) stitch completed.

    Repeat Step 4 in each remaining chain.

    To add a second (or more) row(s):
    To add a second row of HDC stitches, chain 2 and turn your work counterclockwise. You’ll now be working across the tops of the stitches you just made.

    How to start second row of half double crochet, how many chains to start half double crochet

    Step 1: Yarn over and insert your hook into the last stitch of the previous row under top 2 loops (often referred to as the first stitch because it is the first stitch of this row), yarn over (YO) and pull through the stitch. Yarn over (YO) and pull through all three loops on your hook. One HDC Stitch completed.


    Note: The chain 2 does not count as a stitch unless the pattern tells you otherwise. When the chain 2 counts as a stitch (as in my video tutorial above), you’ll skip the first stitch and start your second row by working into the second stitch.

    in progress hdc stitch
    photo tutorial half double crochet
    completed stitch

    Step 2: Yarn over (YO) and insert your hook into the next stitch, yarn over (YO) and pull through the stitch. Yarn over (YO) and pull through all three loops on your hook. One HDC stitch completed.

    in progress hdc stitch
    last step of hdc stitch
    completed half double crochet stitch

    Step 3: Repeat Step 2 in each remaining HDC stitch across.

    Two rows of half double crochet stitch

    To add more rows, you would repeat the instructions for adding your second row until your piece reaches the desired size.

    Completed swatch of half double crochet stitches

    I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial! Please don’t forget to pin and share this post. Like stitch tutorials? Check out my Foundation Half Double Crochet Stitch Tutorial! Want a pattern that uses this stitch? Check out my Sloth Cup Cozy Pattern.

    Follow The Loopy Lamb on Facebook and Instagram! Sign up for my Newsletter to be kept in the loop and never miss a thing.